Author Archives: megadolen

Cosplay propmaking @ Singapore Mini Maker Faire

We have said so many times that this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire is full of excitement. I must say that this segment is definitely one of the contributing factors.

Introducing a new curated area of cosplayers who make their own props!

Edentech

Edentech

Edentech is the brainchild of costume and prop-maker Eden Sng.

He emphasizes using affordable materials such as cardboard, foam and papier mache as well as efficient techniques to create costumes and props that look like the real thing.

Eden will be exhibiting several of his latest projects at the Faire.

E smallFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/EdenTech/140808179268298
Kitsabers

Kitsabers

What started as a hobby for Star Wars enthusiast Kit Woo soon turned into a burning passion, and today, KitSabers is one of Asia’s fastest growing custom lightsaber forges.

Working with a variety of materials including PVC plastic, metal and polycarbonate, Kit has made hundreds of geek dreams come true and created multiple lightsabers in a variety of colors that are perfect for stunting and dueling.

Kit is also the preferred lightsaber smith for FightSaber, a dedicated Star Wars inspired stage choreography and theatrical arts troupe based in Singapore, as well as FightSaber’s satellite groups in Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei.

Visitors to the Faire can expect to see Kit’s sabers in action at the Geek Crafts Expo and on the show floor.

Kitsaberslogo2Website: http://kitsabers.blogspot.sg/
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/KITSABERS
Neo Tokyo Project

Neo Tokyo Project

Neo Tokyo Project (NTP) is a cosplay and pop-culture start-up that aims to bridge the gap between fans of pop-culture and the companies they adore, by bringing characters from popular computer and console games to life.

The company works with corporate partners and sponsors to bring fresh content to the local cosplay community, and is a forerunner in Singapore’s geek crafts culture, especially in the realm of steampunk.

As costume makers, NTP’s EVA foam creations have wowed fans the world over, and they will be exhibiting some of these costumes, as well as steampunk creations at the Faire.

logo_highres_smallWebsite: http://www.neotokyoproject.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/neotokyoproject
Project Zen

Project Zen

Founded in 2011, Project Zen is a costuming and prop-making circle dedicated to pushing the boundaries of cosplay in the local and international scene – through a marriage of proven costume creation and prop-making technologies with quality dramatic performances.

This hobby society brings together close to a dozen individuals armed with more than half a decade of cosplay and stage experience, as well as enthusiasts who strive to constantly challenge themselves; to find new and innovative ways to bring their favorite anime, comic book and game characters, costumes, and props to life.

Project Zen utilizes a wide variety of materials in their creations, and will be showcasing some of their latest costumes and projects at the Faire.

Project Zen PNG for videosWebsite: http://www.project-zen.org
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ProjectZenSG
323369_361150917246623_728363316_oScouter Props is a two person team aiming to create high quality and accurate props and replicas.

They employ a variety of materials and techniques in our creation process, from scratch building, papercraft, sculpting, to resin casting.

With their respective pros and cons, they believe that there is no single absolute preferred technique, and would often utilise a number of disciplines and constantly seek out new methods to achieve our desired result.They hope to be able to share these techniques to benefit fellow crafters, so as to overall, improve workmanship and work quality.

They are especially interested in the utilisation of technology in the propmaking process, such as laser cutting and 3D printing, and its potential benefits.They will be showcasing a number of works and works-in-progress, as well as techniques and materials used in our propmaking process.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scouterpropsarrow

Reading the descriptions alone bring me much anticipation to see the real exhibits and meet their makers at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013. It is eye-opening to learn that several different kind of techniques can be applied in the art of propmaking in cosplay, that technology such as laser cutting and 3D printing are also being considered as a new way of propmaking. Did these intrigued you as well? If so, remember to come by SCAPE Warehouse on 27 & 28 Jul to check out out this special curated area of cosplay art.

The group will also be having a free sharing session entitled “Cosplay Prop-making: Building 3D Maneuver Gear (Shingeki no Kyojin)” on 28 Jul, 4 – 6pm, SCAPE Situation Room, where they will share about creating gears from popular anime series Shingeki no Kyojin. More details can be found here.

An unconventional sculptor – David Liew shares how the same skills can be applied anywhere

I met up with David at the Science Centre Singapore nearly a month ago, only to realise that I have met him before at last year’s Faire.

David Liew came in with Ng Ling Ling at her Sugarpunk booth last year, and we all had an interesting chat then about the need to bring in more crafters for the Singapore Mini Maker Faire. When we met again this time, we had another enjoyable chat about the wide range of crafts he does and how he started crafting.

The showcase

7606_329826530453899_523581062_nDavid will be showcasing unique sculptures made out of discarded plastic drinks bottles. During the interview, I had the opportunity to look at the sculptures themselves. They are really interesting, with lots of details in terms of texture and colours. If I had not already known earlier, I probably would not be able to guess the origins of some of the sculptures.

When asked about his source of inspiration, David shared that he started off with making mini props for the Muppet show “Planet Bizzaro”  in  2005 and 2006 (Reminds me of how Adam Savage of the Mythbusters started by making his own props!). That sounded quite interesting, hence I researched further after the interview and found the photos of the props and the links to the show on David’s Facebook Page, “The Sleeping Iron Foundry“. If you are keen, check it out as well and of course, do not miss out watching the funny Muppet show while checking out the props. Anyway, back to the plastic sculpture, David shared that he found it interesting to work on different types of plastic bottles because they all have different patterns, and you can always add on scraps. While many people throw stuffs away, David tend to keep them for his sculpturing work. Somehow, I find myself identifying with that very well!

Other makes

I was curious about the various different Facebook pages which David maintains online, made a check with him and learnt that he truly works on different areas of interest and maintains these pages to separate the different types of projects he works on. It surprised me that on top of being a sculptor, David is also an illustration artist, and a cake art sculptor. But David’s answer was quite candid and enlightening. “Just using the same sculpting skill sets!”, so he said of two of his endeavours. How true, but it takes certain character to be able to make use of their skill sets and re-apply them elsewhere.  Curious about all his works and how he applies his talent at different places? Come by the Singapore Mini Maker Faire and have a chat with him personally!

Views on making

David is certainly not new to MAKE magazine, Maker Faire and the Maker Movement. When I asked him on his views on making, he shared an important point that making helps to develop problem-solving skills. I find myself agreeing. The making process takes time, and it takes many traits for a maker to complete his or her project. It cultivates patience, perseverance and when you faces problem, you will need to try again and again with alternative solutions.

From my interview session with David, I find this a good takeaway. Thinking further on his point, I find the process of making is akin to working on a school project, where certain important skill sets can be cultivated, and character can be developed. Do you agree?

The workshop

Would you like your own hands-on experience? There is an opportunity now that David will conduct a workshop at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire “Bottle Fleet – Adventures in Recycled Plastic” on 28 July, 1.45pm – 3.15pm, Colony Room at SCAPE. There will be a fee of $10 for the provision of equipment and paints, and while plastic bottles will be provided, participants are encouraged to bring along one which they would like to work on.

Do note that as the workshop involves cutting with blades and the use of hot glue gun, the recommended age would be at least 12 years old. Adults are welcome too!

If you are interested, just make payment at the payment booth at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 at SCAPE on the day of the workshop.

Click here to check out the other workshops and presentations which will be held on that two days!

Introducing E’von LeAngelis S.

The Singapore Mini Maker Faire brings a different range of makers this year. On top of electronics & 3D printing enthusiasts, tinkerers and crafters, we will also have an illustration artist who will demonstrate her work live at her maker booth at the two-day event at SCAPE – Yvonne Soh from “E’von  LeAngelis S.”.

Her background

Yvonne shared that drawing has been very close to her heart since she was a child. She had taken part in drawing competitions in the local community centres and primary school and had been recognised by her teachers in her potential in art. Despite so, she had taken up her parents’ advice to pursue Science and Mathematics classes in her Secondary School years. However, she said that these subjects did not get to her and at the same time, she missed the opportunity to gain the knowledge of an art student. She caught on with illustration when she went to the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA) to pursue her studies in graphic design, and that was after she graduated with a Diploma in Interior Design from Singapore Polytechnic.

Some people probably find her story familiar. How many of you had to pursue something which you did not fancy, but did so anyway for some other reasons?

In Yvonne’s case, she had pursued her passion in drawing at a later part of her study life, and has now found her way forward with it.

Her illustrations

When asked about her technique, Yvonne shared that most of her original illustrations are in black and white and are done either in ink or pencil with detail rendering/ shading before she puts them into Photoshop for colouring. To a layman like me, it is an interesting mixture of traditional and digital techniques. But apparently, most of the illustrations we see these days are done digitally as they speed up the process compared to traditional ways. However, Yvonne expressed an interest to master both skills.

Yvonne said that her inspiration comes from nature and dreams, and her illustrations revolved creations from imagination and memories. In fact, she still recalled her first illustration was based on a dream she had. In a way, her illustrations have become a way for her to translate messages and remember stories.

As she progresses, she also like to help people capture their stories or memories through her illustrations. Hence, she sometimes work on commissioned projects by individuals and organisations.

Her experiences

Yvonne's illustration which won 3rd place in the Downtown Line 3 Hoarding Competition

Yvonne’s illustration which won 3rd place in the Downtown Line 3 Hoarding Competition

Besides working commissioned projects, Yvonne also takes part in competitions.

One that impressed upon me was the one she drew of a train passing through Fort Canning as it portrayed families admiring the greens while they passed through the park. The sight was a pretty one.

The illustration won third place in the Downtown Line 3 Hoarding Competition and is placed at hoardings of the construction at some various spots.

Yvonne had also taken part in Noise Singapore Festival a couple of years back, and found it a memorable experience where her works were even featured on temporary box installations and at bus-stop advertisement panels.

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Yvonne with her artwork at a temporary box installation

Her showcase at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire

At the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013, Yvonne will be showcasing some of her past and present works, including two bilingual flip-up books she did with MandarinaKids – “Grandma’s Eightieth Birthday” and “Little Jay Writes an Adventure”. She will also be showcasing one of her persona project – “Outside the Gadget City” which I personally like due to the interactivity. Find out more about the book through the video she did of “Outside the Gadget City”.

When she is not talking to visitors, she will also be working on her illustrations at her booth. :)

You can check out more of Yvonne’s illustration pieces at her website or her Facebook page. Drop by the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 on 27 & 28 July at SCAPE Warehouse to check her booth out!

Maker Forum

The Mini Maker Faire in Singapore started in 2012, but the local maker movement started at grassroots level before that. There are groups like the Hackerspace, Sustainability Learning Lab (SL2), Handmade Movement Singapore, and probably others that we were not so familiar with.

Are you a maker? If you are not already making as part of a bigger community, you might be someone who makes things on your own, without knowing that there is a bigger community out there, or because you simply prefers doing it solo.

For those who would like to meet up with fellow like-minded makers, you might be pleased to learn that during this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire, we will also be holding a Maker Forum that allows all makers, tinkerers, hackers, crafters, artists, and DIYers to come together for an evening of conversation and socialising.

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William Hooi (Forum facilitator)

The forum will be facilitated by William Hooi, a research mentor in Science Centre Singapore, who is actively involved in our local maker scene, having spearheaded several initiatives such as the regular Makers Meetup held at Hackerspace, and the activities under Hackimedia Singapore.

Invited speakers will cover a variety of subjects from cosplay costume-making to community tinkering (full list below).

  • Bunnie Huang (Why Singapore is better than the US for hardware Makers)
  • James Chan & team (Get Hacking, Singapore – http://www.motochan.com/2013/06/22/hazecast/)
  • Veera & Ibnur ( Community tinkering at SL2)
  • Jason Koh (Makers in cosplay pop-culture)
  • Liyana Sulaiman (Founder, Girls in Tech –encouraging ladies to geek out)
Speakers for the Maker Forum
Andrew 'bunnie' Huang

Andrew ‘bunnie’ Huang

bunnie loves hardware. He loves to make it, and to break it; he loves the smell of it. His passion for hardware began in elementary school, and since then he has garnered a PhD at MIT in EE, and has designed nanophotonic silicon chips, wireless radios, consumer electronics, robotic submarines, and other things. He believes hardware is delightful in part because there are no secrets in hardware; you just need a better microscope. Likewise, he is a proponent of open source hardware, and is an active contributor to the ecosystem. At chumby, he designed several open source hardware platforms, some of which had found its way to the shelves of retailers around the world. bunnie is also an educator; he serves as a Research Affiliate for the MIT Media Lab, technical advisor for several hardware startups and MAKE magazine, and shares his experiences manufacturing hardware in China through his blog. He currently lives in Singapore.

crimson_demon_hunter

Jason Koh

Jason Koh, better known by his online handle Crimson, is a cosplayer, costume maker and pop-culture event organizer.His love affair with cosplay and costume making began more than a decade ago, when he was an intern at cable TV channel AXN. Since then, he has made numerous award winning props and costumes, and his cosplay has been featured around the world. He specializes in making armor costumes from popular computer and video games out of foam and common household materials, and shares his knowledge on his blog at www.neotokyoproject.com

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Veera

Veera is the Kampung Tinkerer and co-founder at the Sustainable Living Lab. Trained officially as a mechanical engineer, he spent his formative years being a general nightmare around the house by taking apart (and not always putting together) all kinds of stuff and starting new organizations in LAN gaming, credit card marketing, competition planning, tinkering and sports. He is listed on several biomedical device patents and has built solar cars, wind turbines, EEG headsets and agricultural drying equipment. Being in land-strapped Singapore but wishing to have a garagelike all inventors had in Hollywood movies led him to start the Sustainable Living Lab which is Singapore’s first (and so far, only) Makerspace. Having had a strong interest in combining technology with development work, he also co-founded the Humanitarian Engineering Alliance.

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Ibnur

A community-oriented ground-up innovator at Ground-UpInitiative, Ibnur believes in innovation, governance and learning from Nature. He has worked on biochip nanofabrication and ‘invisibility cloaks’. He has also developed prototypes such as a tap sensor, antennas, filters, fruit dryers and a very cool water roller. At the Housing and Development Board, he worked on vertical greening and rainwater harvesting. In 2009, he lived and studied at Silicon Valley. He worked at Zong, studying mobile payments, social networks and multiplayer games. He then returned to Singapore to help refine innovation at Ministry of Home Affairs. His teams have won the Daimler-UNESCO Mondialogo Engineering Award for appropriate solutions in rural India, Challenge:Future for an innovation platform prototype, and EDB-BETA for designing a health platform for 2030. He also represented Singapore at the ASEAN Youth Forum on Innovation and Creativity (AYFIC). Having done field assessments at villages in Vietnam, India, Indonesia & Cambodia, he now co-leads the Humanitarian Engineering Alliance (HEAL) and the Sustainable Living Lab (SL2), a tech-driven social enterprise in the Ground-Up Initiative ecosystem.

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Liyana

Liyana is an avid supporter of digital media and technology. She was one of a select few chosen participate in the NUS – MDA overseas Silicon Valley program where she worked on product development for technology startups Qik (Skype acquired) and Burpple. In her spare time she enjoys working on developing new technologies involving 3D food printing and smart electronics, the latter of which she has submitted a paper for ACM CHI 2012. Liyana has also written on ICT for education and economic empowerment as part of her final year thesis.  Her passion is to raise awareness for technology, especially for women which she currently does as the Managing Director of Girls in Tech Singapore, the local chapter of global non profit developed to encourage and motivate women entrepreneurs and engineers in the workforce. She is proud to have increased the organization members in the region from 10 to over 1000 across several countries in the region.  It is her goal to empower more people to discover technology and become inventors.

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Project HazeCast

Hazecast is a project by the people at Tinkertanker, Silicon Straits and their friends, namely Steven, Akmal, YJ, James and Mark. Tinkertanker has been tracking the increasing popularity of Arduino and hardware tinkering, becoming involved in the effort to expand the local mindshare by offering introductory Arduino courses, building their own starter kit, and hopefully soon launching an online store that is friendly to novices and experienced tinkerers alike. They decided to tackle the haze problem from a Maker’s perspective, by building a cheap air quality monitor kit to empower everyone to monitor the quality of the air around them. Different people are still working on various aspects of the project: prototyping the product, characterising the sensors, data visualisation, etc, working together out of the makerspace at Silicon Straits.

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So now, how about the details?

Date: Saturday 27 July
Time: 7.30 pm – 9.45 pm
Venue: HUB (across the road from *SCAPE)
Fee: Free

But do note that pre-registration is required. Simply click on this link.

Accessories making by theKANG

I interviewed Kang at his booth at MAAD, Market of Artists And Designers, a monthly event that takes place at the Red Dot Design Museum. Along with me was a crafter friend I met at another event, and off we went to MAAD to soak in the ambience of creativity, and to get inspired.

IMG-20130607-WA0000During the brief interview with Kang, better known for his accessories label “theKANG”, he shared how he had always liked to personalise his own clothings and accessories such as his Tshirts and shoes during his teenage years. He likes handmade things with a unique touch, and which is different from others.

Kang produced a wide range of accessories using the chainmaille technique, such as rings, bracelets, necklaces and earrings. From the video he shared below, you can see that he is very well versed with it. What is impressive is that he picked it up from scratch on his own.

Recently, he also explored using cable ties in his accessories-making. When asked where he gets inspiration from, Kang said ideas just come along as he makes stuffs. How true!

Kang shares stuffs at the Instructables website too. For those of you who are not familiar, Instructables allow people to share with other people how they do things. It contains lots of wisdom put together by those who believe in the open source.

Kang shared that theKANG is his full time endeavour, and he has been doing this for about a year. Check out his website and Facebook Page too.

Interested to speak with Kang personally? Find him at his booth at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 at SCAPE Warehouse on 27 & 28 July.

Heard of the term “refashioning”?

One maker stood out with her environment theme this year. Agatha Lee runs a blog “Green Issues by Agy” and shares way that each of us can do to make this world more sustainable. I have been a follower since end last year and have always been amazed at her creativity and ideas she shared generously. I still recalled the first few ideas which impressed me quite a bit – crocheting decorative bowls out of old, unwanted jeans, DIY Halloween dress-up kits for herself and her son, and the DIY waterproof school bag cover made out of old umbrella fabric! All are fantastic ideas, aren’t they? :)

We met at the Handmade Movement Craft Fair earlier this year, and I quickly introduced myself and invited Agatha to join the Faire this year. It turns out that she was very interested as well! Since then, I noticed that Agatha had been conducting workshops at many places and events, and they were usually different and refreshing. I was looking forward to check out her workshops at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire this year. Check out my interview with Agatha below. It was my first face-to-face interview with a maker this year, and she has graciously invited me to her place.

How it started

Agatha shared that she mainly does refashioning, and it all started from the year 2005 when she was on her maternity leave and had more time at hand. She said that several  pieces of her clothes were still in good condition (good fabric and nice pattern), so even though they might have been out of fashion, she did not throw them away. When asked about her first piece of refashion, she promptly went to retrieve a pretty blue jacket for me. On the jacket are two pretty flower designs, and she shared with me that those were cut out from an old scarf! What I learnt from her later was that the idea came about because of a burnt hole in the jacket that she need to cover! I think it is a marvellous move, rather than to waste a good jacket. :)

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Agatha and her first refashioned item!

More projects

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Using old jeans to make covers for this chair!

Besides refashioning, there are also several upcycling projects that Agatha did.

Check out the photo of this chair with a jean cover (left) and a short video clip of her introduction of a refashion item that she was making when I visit.

To read more, you can always check out Agatha’s blog here and Facebook page here.

If you are interested to see the end result of the refashioned item in the clip, click here. :)

Inspiration source

It seems like more and more people are using Pinterest as a source of inspiration. Agatha shared that she sometimes browse Pinterest too, though her inspiration also comes from window-shopping. Indeed, I get a lot of inspiration when I window-shop too. There are many good ideas on the street!

Technical challenges

During our interview, I shared with Agatha how I had not embarked on any sewing projects because while I have a sewing machine, I do not have a permanent place for it. Hence, I envied those who have a permanent place for it. Contrary to what I thought, Agatha advised me that sewing with a machine might not really make it easier. She highlighted that there are also issues such as maintenance (the machine might spoil if it is not oiled regularly), or if the parts are not cleaned properly. In fact, she found hand sewing more straightforward at times!

If you are a fabric maker, what is your view and experience on this?

The blog and Facebook Page

Besides the refashioning and upcycling projects, I was also curious about the blog and asked Agatha on how she started that. It turns out that the blog was originally started by another friend and it was focused on environmental issues. She had taken over from the friend after that and began to share more on her refashioned items. I guess the blog took off because not many people in Singapore bother to refashion their clothes, and the blog gave people good ideas on simple ways to inject new life into their old clothes. This would appeal to ladies definitely. Now, it makes me wonder whether there are guys doing it. *wonder*

Agatha also mentioned that she was encouraged by her friend to start a Facebook page less than a year ago when she started to run her first workshop, and since then she has 300 plus following. However, she was curious how interested people are in refashioning, especially when the responses to workshops are inconsistent. But Agatha is persevering in conducting her upcycling and refashioning workshop. In fact, during this upcoming Singapore Mini Maker Faire, Agatha has decided that on top of two workshops that she will run, she will also do a presentation on refashioning! For more information on Agatha’s workshops and presentation, check out the information on our schedule pages on the pre-registration procedures!

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” – Benjamin Franklin

Visitors at the inaugural Singapore Mini Maker Faire would probably remember a booth with a digital ‘Like’ counter tied to poles as well as the adjacent booth with electronic kits for kids.

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Wai Him (left) and Adrian (right)

The digital counter was controlled by an Arduino, an open-source platform that allows people to build their own gadgets while the electronic kits are for younger children to start tinkering with electronics as they are less intimidating. The booths belong to friends Adrian and Wai Him, both makers and hobbyists.

Many visitors to their booths discovered that the electronic kits and Arduino are fantastic platforms for their children to pick-up electronics in an interesting way through experiential learning. Adrian and Wai Him shared with me something once said by Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, that a person may forget if he was simply being told. Hence, this explains the title of this blogpost. Adrian and Wai Him are guided by the belief that a person may remember if being taught (such as using additional visual aids like powerpoint), but the real learning occurs when the person is involved through experimentation and play.

Adrian and Wai Him have joined forces this year in returning to the second Singapore Mini Maker Faire. On top of their maker booth, they will have a presentation to share on how families can have fun, learn together and build interactive projects for the home making use of the Arduino platform. Let’s hear from them more as returning makers. :)

What makes you return to the Mini Maker Faire?

A & WH : This event is a good opportunity for the general public to have a better understanding of the Maker Culture. By soaking in the atmosphere of Makers, Dreamers, Creators and Builders at the Maker Faire, people would be inspired to start making their own creations and hopefully in turn enrich their lives.

What was your experience like during the last Maker Faire? Did you notice any trend among the people interested in your booth and your gadgets? Were they people who are already into electronics or novices? What did it feel like sharing your experience with electronic gadgets?

A & WH : Some visitors had never heard about the ‘Arduino’ & the maker movement. After sharing, they seems motivated enough to go explore further. Some had heard a little about ‘Arduino’ but don’t know how to take the first step. We’re heartened to have interacted with many parents at our booths who wished their child can learn electronics and have fun along the way.

(Personally, I think it is encouraging when you get visitors who have no prior knowledge of your stuffs. It is a possible sign that people are keen to find out more about something beyond their comfort zone, and that is a good thing! At the point of the interview, Adrian and Wai Him were still contemplating how to better help those interested to find out more about Arduino. It is great to learn of their subsequent decision to share more via a presentation. )

Did you think the Maker Faire was useful to the maker movement here? Did you see any changes since then?

A & WH : Yes to both. There has been impact especially to those who are already aware and searching around for the community of makers locally. One of your Science Centre colleague William Hooi has been very active in the maker community and generating interest in the maker scene. More should be done to raise awareness in the maker movement. This is a good platform for science centre to reach-out to the public and schools and make learning science and technology fun by leveraging on the diversity of ideas of the maker community.

(Kudos to William and his relentless efforts!)

What are you intending to showcase this time?

A & WH : Like last year, our concept is still to bring across the message ‘Start your Maker journey one small step at a time.  In time to come, you’ll look back and find you’ve taken a giant leap’. We will extend our showcase based on last year. So we’ll still show the ‘Like’ counter. To show what it was last year and how it has evolved this year. We’re also planning an interactive light or sound display that is controlled by participants at the booth (eg using distance sensors).

In addition to introducing and selling electronics/hobbyist parts and kits, we’re planning to conduct experiential learning workshops in electronics, Arduino and Arduino robotics.

What are your expectations from the second Mini Maker Faire held in Singapore, and what would you like to achieve out of it?

A & WH : We hope that the second Mini Maker Faire brings more people together (compared to last year) and raise more people’s awareness on the maker movement.

Hope that Science Centre can do more on publicity so that the event can be made known to people who are NOT aware of the maker movement. Is there a better way (or more fund) to reach out to more schools such as with resources from MOE? How about asking last year’s participants (including makers, vendors, sponsors) to publicise on their website or during their events etc

(A & WH provided us very honest feedback about his expectations from the second Singapore Mini Maker Faire. Indeed, we are also looking at extending our reach beyond those who are already fans of the maker movement, so that more can benefit from the goodness of this movement. The importance of the call for more publicity is very real, and we will not be able to do it alone. Throughout the past year, since the last Faire, it is heartening that our following (at seen from our Facebook page) had nearly doubled, and more importantly, we have seen a growth in the variety of the makers that have got to know about the Faire. *beam* Hence, as suggested by A & WH, we hope to garner all your support to help us spread the words as much as possible, by linking to our blog, liking our Facebook page, following our Twitter account and sharing our posts. We knew that many of you have already done that. Our heartfelt gratitude for all your efforts! :D )

Would you have any advice or words of encouragement to give to newcomers at this year’s Maker Faire? How about advice to people who are new to electronic gadgets?

A & WH : For newcomers, do not worry that what you have to share is simple or easy. The simplicity could be the motivating factor for some people to start their Maker journey.

For people new to electronic gadgets, take a look at our website (3egadgets.com) and come over to our booth. Meanwhile, they can look up the internet to see gadgets that people can make themselves and go to the library to borrow some good books on basic electronics and Arduino.

Wai Him also penned his own entry for our blog last year. If you are interested, simply click on this link. To see Adrian’s entry in our blog, simply click on this link.

Yarns, bags and dolls – A different take on making

There were many maker booths at the inaugural Singapore Mini Maker Faire last year but Ling Ling’s booth stood out from the rest because her projects were of a different nature from the majority of the other showcases. Instead of electronics and robotics stuffs, Ling Ling was showcasing her beautifully crocheted bags and gothic dolls.

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I was excited to know that Ling Ling is returning because I am an innate craft lover and I am drawn to anything crafty. Hence, I was very curious what she will be showing this time round. It turned out that Ling Ling intended to run a workshop on top of showcasing her work at a booth! Read on to find out the motivation behind her return to the Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

Why the return

I sensed a lot of enthusiasm in Ling Ling when she replied my question on what made her return as a maker (even when it was over email). It seemed like a redundant question that I need not have asked. Ling Ling shared that she is a big fan of the MAKE Magazine and the Maker Faire so she is really keen to be involved. She was also kind to mention that the organisers have been very supportive, helpful and genuinely passionate about crafts and making things. *big smile*

Experience in the inaugural Singapore Mini Maker Faire

When asked about her experience last year, Ling Ling mentioned the good turnout despite being away from the city area. She noticed that people were very interested in the activity workshops, especially the kids. Hence, this year, she was inspired to run her own workshop! *yippee*

However, Ling Ling also observed that the MAKE Magazine’s main audience in Singapore seems to be the engineering and science community – circuits and programming kits, rather than the textile crafts. This was lacking in the maker representation in the inaugural Faire, hence she hopes to see more crafters join in this year, and a bigger section for textile and fibre arts. Indeed, this was something that the organising team realised as well, and are making efforts to improve. :)

One takeway from last year’s Faire for Ling Ling was the network with other fellow makers, who continued to connect online, at Maker Meetups and similar events. So, if you have been a lone maker who would like to know more like-minded people, why not drop by this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire?

Advice to newcomers

Lastly, here is a word of advice from Ling Ling to all newcomers at this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

Join us if you’re passionate about crafts and sharing your passion… And just enjoy the atmosphere and camaraderie! It’s a positive spirit and something we really need here in Singapore.”

Ling Ling’s passion for crafts and the Maker Faire drives us as well, and we hope to bring in more makers from different background and expertise so that there can be more sharing and learning through exchanges between makers.

If you are interested in the previous blog we had posted about Ling Ling, you can read about it here. Her works can also be found here.

Update: Ling Ling will be conducting an “Intro to Crochet for Beginners” on 28 Jul, 12.45pm – 1.30pm, at SCAPE Level 4 (Colony Room).

Fee: $8/participant (Includes yarn and one crochet hook)
No pre-registration required, slots on a first-come-first-served basis.  Please make payment at the SMMF Counter at the Colony to confirm your slot.

Words of advice from last year’s workshop facilitator, Ken

As a lead-up to this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire on 27 & 28 July, we went round consolidating advice from some of the repeat makers which they felt are useful for new makers or makers wannabe.

Ken conducted a workshop at the inaugural Singapore Mini Maker Faire held at the Science Centre Singapore last year. Like many others, I was awed by Ken’s project. He was working on animated paper-craft with wireless inductive power transmission. Click here to read more about his project showcased last year.

Reason for returning

This year, Ken is returning to the Mini Maker Faire to help his colleague instead. He shared that he really enjoyed the event last year, where the smiles on people’s faces after seeing his work encouraged him to come back again this year, even though he will not be taking a booth this time.

Ken shared that last year, he had 30 sign-ups for his workshop and many of them were children. He was motivated when the children left the workshop being happy with what they had learnt.

Words of advice for workshop facilitators

Having conducted one round of workshop, Ken have the following advice for new makers:-

1.       Don’t get panic if too many people come to your workshop, although you may not have enough for them, because that means you have done a great job, and people are really interested in your work.

 2. Keep being open-minded to any comment and question, no matter whether they are good or bad. Having an open mind is one essential personality of a maker :D

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We will post a separate blog entry later on the booth by Ken’s colleague at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire this year.

Watch this space for more updates on the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013!

Just another 3D printer? No, it is slightly different this time.

Introducing next is another repeat maker from last year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire – Wee Kiam Peng.

If you cannot recall who he was, he is the person behind Orangeknob and the portable self-replicating 3D printer “Portabee”.

The whole idea of having a portable 3D printer at a fairly reasonable price was so appealing then that I was actually considering to get one of them for myself. And maybe still contemplating. :P

Advice

When approached to give some words of advice to people new to the making culture, Kiam Peng amazed me with his super fast response. Every single answer was sharp and straight to the point.

Kiam Peng shared that he had signed up again as maker this year because of his passion for making. Interestingly, he described last year’s Mini Maker Faire as “crazy” but in a positive way. It was meeting a lot of like-minded folks that made it “crazy” for him. I guess he must have found himself being approached to find out more about his 3D printer most of the time.  He felt that the Singapore Mini Maker Faire does help encourage the maker movement and the interest in 3D printing here in Singapore. In fact, he highlighted that every little steps help. How true indeed!

As repeat makers, Kiam Peng expressed interest to see a greater variety of DIY items. I guess this would always be something that most makers like to see – “to inspire and be inspired”.

Hence, Kiam Peng urged all makers to be more forthcoming, to dare to show the world that you are creative and that you can make a difference.

New plans

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Sneak peak!

We were excited when we hear of the giant 3D printer that Orangeknob is going to showcase.

How big would it be? What kind of prototypes can it print? I believe many people at the upcoming Mini Maker Faire will be similarly curious about it.

Ideas and possibilities never fail to bring up the spirit in people. Does the sound of this giant printer perk you up a bit and ignite your interest?

To learn more about Orangeknob’s latest project, check them out at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013, coming to you on 27 & 28 July at SCAPE.

If you are keen to read more about how Orangeknob was formed, read our blog entry last year here.