Author Archives: megadolen

About Ms Chang Wei Mun and her DIY Cake Toppers and Wooden Dolls

LCLMakerFaire2014Ms Chang Wei Mun, one of the co-founders of Little Craft Loft, will be conducting a workshop on how to make cake toppers and wooden dolls on 27 July (Sunday), 3.15pm to 4.45pm at Senja Cashew Community Club. Check out this interview with Wei Mun to learn more about her and Little Craft Loft.

Can you share more about Little Craft Loft?

Little Craft Loft is about the love for our children. It is about discovering the meaning in designing and making for our children. The best gifts are made from scratch, showered with love, and crafted with imagination.

I have always loved crafting. I relish the simple joy of creating something beautiful from scratch. I get a lot of satisfaction from dreaming up a design to actually making it with my own hands. I adore my little three year old girl and have channeled this passion into making things for her.

It’s incredibly meaningful and fulfilling to put in time and effort into crafting projects and to see my daughter’s face light up when I finally complete it and give it to her. I’ve made simple toys, birthday decorations and lots of clothes so far.

It doesn’t matter if the end product isn’t perfect or of commercial quality. These don’t matter to children. What matters is that they know that mummy or daddy had specially made it for them. I learnt this when my daughter showed that she could understand, even when she was only 1 year old, that some of her clothes were made by me and would prefer to wear those clothes. It can be difficult sometimes to test fit clothes on her as she would adamantly refuse to take them off!

I started making cake toppers  a year ago as I wanted to create a special gift for my daughter’s second birthday. I came across adorable wedding wooden doll cake toppers in Etsy and wanted to try my hand at making a unique and personalised doll for her birthday.

After learning the basics of making a painted wooden doll, I applied my dress making experience and made whimsical little clothes for the wooden dolls. I hope to create a new doll for her every year based on her current interests.

What can participants expect to make for the course? Is it suitable for children or adult?

I hope to inspire other parents to design and make crafts for their loved ones, starting with wooden doll making. I will teach my own unique way of making a dressed-up doll with hand sewn outfits.

Workshop participants will get to learn this unique crafting hobby and take home their own wooden dolls. They will learn the basics in doll making that involves sketching, painting, selection of fabrics and sewing techniques. It is a hands-on workshop and participants will get all the materials needed to make their own unique dolls.

Parents are more than welcome to participate together with their children. However, as some painting, sewing and glueing work is involved, I would recommend that the children be aged at least 6 and above.

If you are interested in Wei Mun’s work, check out her website at www.littlecraftloft.com.

How do you tell the stories of Singapore buildings through 3D printing?

Next, we would like to introduce Shafiq Ali, an entrepreneur with his own 3D printing retail and service business, Mēkā. Are you curious about what Mēkā means? Read on to find out.

About Shafiq

Shafiq shared that he has been interested in taking things apart and building stuffs ever since he was a child, that it always give him a real sense of achievement. His fascination in 3D printing came about when he was watching a video of a Makerbot Cupcake CNC 3D printer. This has prompted him to research further into 3D printing and subsequently to decide to get involved from a business angle, hence setting up Mēkā which means Maker in Japanese. Currently, Mēkā is the custodian of the 3D Printing Materials Store in Asia and is also the main driving force behind BuiltinSG, a project supported by the NLB as part of the SG50 celebrations.

Taking part in the Singapore Mini Maker Faire

Shafiq first learnt about the Singapore Mini Maker Faire last year when he first started on his 3D printing business. He was recommended by many to participate in it, but as he was relatively new in the 3D printing industry then, he has decided to take part as an observer first.

1405249124013This year, Shafiq will be taking up a booth and will be displaying 3D printed models and playing some videos as part of the BuiltinSG project done in conjunction with SG50 Celebrations. BuiltinSG is a project to tell the story of different buildings in Singapore and the roles that they played in shaping our lives. 3D printed models will be produced to be showcased to the visitors of the Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

At the same time, he will also be showcasing the different materials that can be used for FDM/FFF 3D printers, such as Laywood, Laybrick, Carbon Fibre PLA and High Temperature PLA.

If you are interested in the BuiltinSG project or Mēkā, do drop by Shafiq’s booth and have a chat with him.

From sunlight to circuit boards – The art and science of print-making

ArtScience Museum will also be participating at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2014. You will expect to see works by designer Pradeesh Lal, creator Leon Lim and ArtScience Museum’s team of trained Docents who implement and execute activities and events for the Museum.

Pradeesh Lal

New Picture (3)Pradeesh is a designer whose areas of focus include Architecture, Industrial Product Design, Precision Mechanical Design and Illustration. He was the Co-founder and Creative Director at Revente India, an India based firm working in diverse fields of Architecture, Design, Construction and Property holdings. In addition, he worked at Temasek Polytechnic as a Design Engineer at the Robotics and Automation Center, before co-founding Blokko, a start-up that is working on developing 3D printing platform targeted at kids.

His philosophy is to try making life less complicated with his expertise in the mentioned areas. Pradeesh finds romance in architecture because of the effect it has on people and the effect people have on it.

One of the hardest challenges is the search for your own creative confidence, for it can be elusive. However he advices to trust yourself to do what you want.

Pradeesh will be conducting a 3D printing activity including doodling with 3D pens and printers.

Leon Lim

New Picture (4)Leon Lim is a person who likes to create and make stuff. He enjoys creating both hardware and software, often trying to marry the two together. He messes around often with the Arduino platform which is what got him started with electronics again. His latest project includes creating wearable tech with Arduino Lilypad. Besides being in the maker community and using Adobe software for about 20 years, he also contributes to the Adobe user group in Singapore. The various hardware and software that he made for his company work to increase productivity and make life easier for the world.

Leon will be demonstrating “Touch & Print”, an assembly of art, science and technology. Visitors can expect to see a demonstration of PCB printing and etching and try their hands at doing it themselves. In addition, they can also design artwork that can be heat transferred to different materials such as T-shirt, fabric or metal.

Docent team, ArtScience Museum (Painting with Light: Cyanotypes)

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ArtScience Museum’s team of trained Docents come from a range of interesting backgrounds, including art, design, education, engineering and social work. They implement a busy and varied range of activities and events with families, schools, adults and other groups on a daily basis at ArtScience Museum. As this includes photography, architecture, and whatever subjects are being presented through the touring exhibition programme, there is never a dull moment! The Docent team is therefore expert at absorbing information fast and presenting it clearly and in an accessible way for everyone.

The ArtScience Museum Docents will be running the Cyanotype workshop where visitors can learn about one of the oldest photographic processes.

Guest Makers

Besides these makers, do look out for guest appearances by some makers throughout the two-day Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

DeCONSTRUCT – How Nishant shares his tinkering passion with his peers

Nishant is an 18-year-old student from Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) and he will be participating as a maker at the first Singapore Mini Maker Faire Education Day that will happen at University Town (National University of Singapore) on 19 July together with other student makers.

He shared that he liked to take things apart since he was young and he thanked his parents for being very supportive of him, although he admitted that he is still chided for making a mess and damaging the floor and other household objects in the process of his tinkering. His parents also make sure that he tinkers within safety limits, though he admitted that he still tries to challenge the limits at times. Well, that sounds totally characteristic of a maker, doesn’t it?

Tinkering challenges

Nishant shared that he has always worked with minimal tools. Although he would have appreciated more tools, he feels that it has taught him how to make do, which is actually a good chance to innovate! Nishant also shared that tinkering had affected his school work a bit when he was building a Tesla Coil in Secondary 3 but he does not regret that because he really love what he did and he is glad to have done it. Well, the important thing is to learn through experience and manage things better the next time round!

Sharing this hobby with peers

Nishant thought it would be great to share his tinkering hobby with other people. A lot of his friends find Science boring and do not see the purpose behind what they learn. Nishant feels that most people will not see the purpose unless they are shown the possibility of application of what they learn. He cited the case of his friends who were not particularly interested in the details of things even though they thought it cool when he built a Tesla Coil in school when he was in Secondary 3. Hence, he thought a hands-on session might make a difference, and it would make people learn in the process of creating.

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From left (standing) – Yun Da, Nishant, and Gabriel (Organisers of DeCONSTRUCT)

He decided to run an event with two other friends, Gabriel Tan and Lee Yun Da, to let his fellow schoolmates take things apart and make something new from the parts, and in the process they will be able to apply Physics, design and electronics. The event was DeCONSTRUCT and it was a collaboration project between ACS (Independent) and Science Centre Singapore, run by Nishant. It was not all pink and rosy initially. He had a tight timeline to advertise the event to his fellow schoolmates and was worried about a meagre sign-up, although it picked up towards the end. After the three-day tinkering workshop, he was glad it was a success, with many participants giving him encouraging feedback after the event. One participant wrote to him, “It’s such an eye opener for me. I never liked Physics although I’ve been studying it for 9 years. It is only today that I realise how wide is its applicability and how far your imagination can stretch. I will re-approach Physics from a new perspective now”.

With the success of this year’s event, Nishant hopes to bring DeCONSTRUCT to other schools as well, so that other students can also get to experience it. Sounds like a great plan!

We wish Nishant all the best with his tinkering endeavours and hope he can continue to inspire his peers and make a difference! Catch Nishant, Gabriel and Yun Da at their booth at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire Education Day on 19 July at University Town, NUS!

Would you like to design your own clay model character?

Mr Tay Swee Siong, an adjunct lecturer in the National Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA) and Nanyang Polytechnic (NYP), will be taking part at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire for the first time this year, and he will be sharing with us his knowledge on clay modelling to create more awareness about this form of art. Read on to find out more about Mr Tay.

Being a lecturer on sculpture, drawing, painting and design and having worked with a variety of mediums like wood, metal, resins and kinetic sculptures, Mr Tay is particularly interested in clay modelling, and specifically in human figurative sculpture. He shared that he has been making clay models for more than 15 years, ranging from life size human figurines to figurines as small as 20 cm and he kept some of these models at his studio. Here is a photo of an exhibition showcasing his students’ work at a library.

exhibit

At the Singapore Mini Maker Faire that will take place at Senja-Cashew CC over the weekend of 26 & 27 July, Mr Tay will both showcase some of his works at a maker booth and also conduct a workshop.

Named “Clay Modelling and Character Design”, the workshop will demonstrate the process of making a clay model character design by introducing various sculpting materials, tools and practices. Mr Tay shared that the intention to introduce sculpture to the public is the main inspiration for running this workshop.

If you are curious about clay modelling, do come by Mr Tay’s booth and find out more! Registration details for the workshop will also be out soon.

Do you know “reprap”?

Do you know what is “reprap” in the field of 3D printing? Short for Replicating Rapid Prototypers, it allows self-replicating, i.e. allowing the making of components which can be assembled into another DIY 3D printer. If you are into printing your own 3D printer and you are keen to join a like-minded community, check out this informal group, SG-RUG which stands for SG RepRap User Group, initiated by Lim Soon Wei for a group of 3D printer owners who meet up once in a while to catch up on new development on each others’ projects.

20130727_131713Last year, Soon Wei and some members of SG-RUG took part at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire and showcased the “Cube 3D printer” he made. His partner Ian showcased “Rostock”. When asked about the project that he was working on, Soon Wei shared enthusiastically about a tri colour print head that he was working on. While Soon Wei is aware of the Maker Faires overseas, he did not realised that we have one in Singapore until a few months before the last Faire. His group hence took the opportunity to sign up for a booth to showcase some of the printers that they are making, hoping to interest more people in the area of “reprap”.

2014-04-08-22_49_03Soon Wei shared the challenges of juggling work commitment and running meet-ups for the group, which I believed most working individuals will face, but despite that, members do make effort to meet up regularly. Since the Singapore Mini Maker Faire last year, his group has also came together to set up an online shop “Justprint3D”! This year, they would like to showcase their new printer, the Ai3 (Aluminum i3) printer. From the last year’s Faire, he felt that there are more people becoming interested in 3D printers but are not sure how to start. SG-RUG would like to show these people how by introducing them a new design print which is easy to build.

If you are interested to be part of this community, do visit the online presence that Soon Wei has created for the community and come by the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2014 to take a look at these machines yourself!

Reprap Forum
Facebook SG-Reprap

Justprint3D website & Facebook page

Introducing Benjamin Tan and his origami friends

DSCF2041a Benjamin and friends took part at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire last year at SCAPE, where they showcased the origami works they have done, and introduced the art of paper folding to visitors of the Faire.

He shared that he started folding origami some 20 years back when he came across a Chinese book on origami. His interest developed after having folded the models from this book, and he bought a second book “Teach Yourself Origami” by Robert Harbin, which showed him that there is a lot more to origami than the traditional models. His interest has sustained until today.

Benjamin has his own origami website here.  He and his friends are also members of the group “Origami Singapore”, an informal gathering of origami enthusiasts in Singapore.

Takeaway from SMMF13 and advice for first time participating maker

When asked about his takeaway from his involvement in the Singapore Mini Maker Faire last year, Benjamin shared that it is a good platform for makers to meet each other. During the event, he learnt that there are many people making different kind of things. He also observed that there were many children participants and he hope to see more adults showing interest as well.

As a word of advice, he would like to remind all first time participating makers to make good use of their set-up time, and also to take the time to walk around no matter how busy you are at your booth. He felt that it would be important to also learn from other makers and make friends with them.

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Good maker spirit, Benjamin! We hope you get to know more makers this time round! Who knows what kind of exciting new projects you might end up doing together?

“Making is caring.” – Elda Webb

“Making is caring.” – Elda Webb

I had an interesting chat with Elda to learn why and how she became involved in the Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

During the chat, she returned several times to the point that making should be a way to solve a problem, so that it is purposeful. She attributed her belief to the Mexico culture in which she was brought up in, where people are creative in coming up with solutions to problems.

To Elda, making is actually a way to care for others. I thought that is a nice perspective and it gives a different meaning to the act of making. Have you also made something because it is needed by somebody else? Are you also motivated in the same manner to make things? How can you make things to improve the lives of others? Elda made me think deeper into this.

Getting involved in Singapore Mini Maker Faire

Elda became involved in the Singapore Mini Maker Faire since its inauguration two years back. Searching online on 3D printing stuffs then, she found a link to our website. She signed up as a volunteer for two years and it is exciting that she will be conducting her first workshops on design thinking this year. Speaking with Elda, I learnt that she had her fair share of hesitation about the sharing, hence the delay in coming forth to conduct workshops for our event.  This hesitation is definitely not an act of selfishness but a lack of confidence. But confidence can be built up with encouragement, and she felt that everybody need someone to assure them that they are doing well.

During our conversation, we chatted about how common this thinking is amongst some makers, and how she wanted to help people build confidence by introducing a set of design thinking steps which could serve as some form of guide. First, she wanted to break the barrier of the mind, and show that everybody have the potential to be a designer. This is something she would like to achieve with her workshops.

“Everybody need someone to assure them that they are doing well”. – Elda

The way forward

Elda is of view that the momentum for the Maker Movement in Singapore has been built up and should continue to roll, and it is still important to build greater awareness as there are still many people who are not familiar and receptive to the idea of making. On her own, she has plans to continue her workshops so that she can continue to inspire people to make and design solutions to problems. It is really cool to know she has such plans!

Interested to attend Elda’s Design Thinking workshops on 26 July, 1.00pm – 2.30pm or 27 July, 10am – 11.30am at the Senja-Cashew CC? Simply email  the.curious.design.network@gmail.com for registration details.workshop Logo

Using Arduino to improve others’ way of living

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Did you notice a group of students showcasing their arduino-related projects at last year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire?

There was an Android phone-controlled RC Car running around right in front of it and there was an interesting “Home Automation using Smartphone” project.

The same group from the Arduino Club of ITE College East, led by Mr Arthur Pedida, will be participating at this year’s Faire again, but this time, they will be showcasing new hardware electronic projects using Microcontroller such as PIC and Arduino, and different types of “Mobile Robot” which could be controlled using Smartphones and Personal Computers via the Internet.

Experience at Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013

artMr Pedida shared that it was exciting and eye-opening for his team to meet other Makers showcasing their projects, thus allowing them to broaden their ideas in building new projects. It was also a fun experience for them to interact with other Makers and members of public, especially the challenges that they experienced from planning to construction to testing.

Discussing challenges is something that Mr Pedida has highlighted as sometimes visitors can help the team discover solutions during the process of the sharing. Hence, Mr Pedida felt that this should be encouraged.

Arduino Club

Jannah ITE College East Arduino Club President, Nurul Jannah Bte Mohamed will be leading her club members at their booth, together with Mr Pedida. He shared with us that Jannah is currently a 2 nd year Student of Nitec in Electronics specialized in Mobile Devices and she is actively involved in Arduino as her CCA. She also participated with her group at the “Assistive, Rehabilitative & Therapeutic Technology” competition jointly organised by the Singapore Therapeutic, Assistive and Rehabilitation Technologies Centre and the Centre for Enabled Learning in March this year, receiving a Merit Award for their project. Jannah will be showcasing her project which helps elders with disability to control their appliances without the need of touching any switches.

Interested to speak with Mr Pedida and Jannah regarding their projects and challenges they faced? Check out their booth at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire at Senja-Cashew CC on 26 & 27 July!

About Pooja, Bookbinding and a Collaborative Installation

I had an interesting chat with Pooja on the afternoon before she went back to New York for her break.

Although Pooja ran a workshop on concertina-spine binding last year at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013, I had no chance to meet up with her and speak with her. I had written a blog post then to introduce her based on some email exchanges, so this time round, I was glad to be able to arrange a chit-chat session.

Pooja offered to use a co-working space she has reserved. It is called Grey Projects and the location was at Kim Tian, Tiong Bahru. It is a nice quiet place and it also happened to be the day before an exhibition of self-published books that the Grey Projects has planned. So, thanks to Pooja, I had a quick glimpse of this interesting exhibition’s behind-the-scene preparation!

Opinion of the Singapore Maker Movement

As it is Pooja’s third-year experience at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire (she was a visitor in the first year!), I was rather interested to find out her view of the maker movement here in Singapore. Compared to when Pooja first came to Singapore, she felt that the maker movement here had became more organised. She observes more ground-up efforts, more meet-up sessions, more people trying their hands on DIY stuff. She remarked that it is a dramatic development.

When asked whether there is any community that she thinks we can still reach out to, Pooja gave an interesting reply. Instead of highlighting a hobby group (which I was expecting), Pooja replied that we should look into programmes that can reach the senior citizens and the National Servicemen, based on her own observation at the classes she conducts for the National Arts Council (NAC). She elaborated that these two communities seem to have a lot of interest to pick up new skills. So, for makers out there, keep a look out for chances to reach out to these two communities!

Portfolio-making workshop

image_3Pooja will run a workshop to create a cloth-covered portfolio for holding stationery, drawings, photographs and so forth, using luscious book cloth and beautiful Japanese Chiyogami papers.

Her workshop will be held on 27 July, Sunday, 2.45pm – 4.15pm at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire at Senja-Cashew CC and you can find the registration site here.

Special Highlight : Bookbinding Day and Collaborative Installation

Besides conducting a workshop, Pooja is also participating in this year’s Maker Faire in two different ways. In three weeks’ time, Pooja will be part of the SMMF2014: Bookbinding Day where she joins Ian Tan, Mariko Watanabe and S T Leng in a series of bookbinding workshops to teach different bookbinding projects.

Pooja will also be embarking on an exciting project for all visitors of the Singapore Mini Maker Faire, where everyone gets a chance to participate and create a “folded element” of a collaborative-sculpture book object. On the first day of the Faire, Pooja will be personally guiding interested visitors on the project from the opening of the event until 1pm. She will also be around on Sunday, both to conduct her bookbinding workshop from 2.45pm to 4.15pm and to conclude her collaborative project towards the end of the event. It’ll be another exciting component of this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire. If you are not able to drop by when Pooja is around, do not worry as we will also have volunteers who will help to guide you. Do come join us and have some fun creating!

Want to know what other things Pooja do? You can check out her blog here.