Tag Archives: crafts

From traditional printing press to blinky circuits

Were you here with us at the Marquee, Science Centre Singapore for our first lead-up family workshop for the Singapore Mini Maker Faire last Saturday? It was an amazing array of activities and we hope you had managed to cover everything if you were here.

Check out some of the station activities that were arranged!
LED activities/ Using DIY remote buttons for Scratch software
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Learn about simple circuits by making a blingtastic circuit

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Sciencey games: Kendama
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Amaker3D: Open source 3D printing
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3D modelling and design with Henry Wong and Darren See
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Quilling and paper crafting with Priyanka Datta
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Solder your own wireframe models by Pan Yew
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Colour Me – by artist Richard Kearns
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Communicate your Science: a “Be a writer” talent hunt and children’s talk show, by Sindu Sreebhavan of Kids Parade Magazine
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If you had missed this workshop, no worries, there will be other opportunities. Do watch this space or follow us on our Singapore Mini Maker Faire Facebook Page! Remember to block your calendar for our actual Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2014 which will happen on 26 & 27 July 2014 at Senja-Cashew Community Club.

Cosplay propmaking @ Singapore Mini Maker Faire

We have said so many times that this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire is full of excitement. I must say that this segment is definitely one of the contributing factors.

Introducing a new curated area of cosplayers who make their own props!

Edentech

Edentech

Edentech is the brainchild of costume and prop-maker Eden Sng.

He emphasizes using affordable materials such as cardboard, foam and papier mache as well as efficient techniques to create costumes and props that look like the real thing.

Eden will be exhibiting several of his latest projects at the Faire.

E smallFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/EdenTech/140808179268298
Kitsabers

Kitsabers

What started as a hobby for Star Wars enthusiast Kit Woo soon turned into a burning passion, and today, KitSabers is one of Asia’s fastest growing custom lightsaber forges.

Working with a variety of materials including PVC plastic, metal and polycarbonate, Kit has made hundreds of geek dreams come true and created multiple lightsabers in a variety of colors that are perfect for stunting and dueling.

Kit is also the preferred lightsaber smith for FightSaber, a dedicated Star Wars inspired stage choreography and theatrical arts troupe based in Singapore, as well as FightSaber’s satellite groups in Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei.

Visitors to the Faire can expect to see Kit’s sabers in action at the Geek Crafts Expo and on the show floor.

Kitsaberslogo2Website: http://kitsabers.blogspot.sg/
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/KITSABERS
Neo Tokyo Project

Neo Tokyo Project

Neo Tokyo Project (NTP) is a cosplay and pop-culture start-up that aims to bridge the gap between fans of pop-culture and the companies they adore, by bringing characters from popular computer and console games to life.

The company works with corporate partners and sponsors to bring fresh content to the local cosplay community, and is a forerunner in Singapore’s geek crafts culture, especially in the realm of steampunk.

As costume makers, NTP’s EVA foam creations have wowed fans the world over, and they will be exhibiting some of these costumes, as well as steampunk creations at the Faire.

logo_highres_smallWebsite: http://www.neotokyoproject.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/neotokyoproject
Project Zen

Project Zen

Founded in 2011, Project Zen is a costuming and prop-making circle dedicated to pushing the boundaries of cosplay in the local and international scene – through a marriage of proven costume creation and prop-making technologies with quality dramatic performances.

This hobby society brings together close to a dozen individuals armed with more than half a decade of cosplay and stage experience, as well as enthusiasts who strive to constantly challenge themselves; to find new and innovative ways to bring their favorite anime, comic book and game characters, costumes, and props to life.

Project Zen utilizes a wide variety of materials in their creations, and will be showcasing some of their latest costumes and projects at the Faire.

Project Zen PNG for videosWebsite: http://www.project-zen.org
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ProjectZenSG
323369_361150917246623_728363316_oScouter Props is a two person team aiming to create high quality and accurate props and replicas.

They employ a variety of materials and techniques in our creation process, from scratch building, papercraft, sculpting, to resin casting.

With their respective pros and cons, they believe that there is no single absolute preferred technique, and would often utilise a number of disciplines and constantly seek out new methods to achieve our desired result.They hope to be able to share these techniques to benefit fellow crafters, so as to overall, improve workmanship and work quality.

They are especially interested in the utilisation of technology in the propmaking process, such as laser cutting and 3D printing, and its potential benefits.They will be showcasing a number of works and works-in-progress, as well as techniques and materials used in our propmaking process.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scouterpropsarrow

Reading the descriptions alone bring me much anticipation to see the real exhibits and meet their makers at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013. It is eye-opening to learn that several different kind of techniques can be applied in the art of propmaking in cosplay, that technology such as laser cutting and 3D printing are also being considered as a new way of propmaking. Did these intrigued you as well? If so, remember to come by SCAPE Warehouse on 27 & 28 Jul to check out out this special curated area of cosplay art.

The group will also be having a free sharing session entitled “Cosplay Prop-making: Building 3D Maneuver Gear (Shingeki no Kyojin)” on 28 Jul, 4 – 6pm, SCAPE Situation Room, where they will share about creating gears from popular anime series Shingeki no Kyojin. More details can be found here.

Accessories making by theKANG

I interviewed Kang at his booth at MAAD, Market of Artists And Designers, a monthly event that takes place at the Red Dot Design Museum. Along with me was a crafter friend I met at another event, and off we went to MAAD to soak in the ambience of creativity, and to get inspired.

IMG-20130607-WA0000During the brief interview with Kang, better known for his accessories label “theKANG”, he shared how he had always liked to personalise his own clothings and accessories such as his Tshirts and shoes during his teenage years. He likes handmade things with a unique touch, and which is different from others.

Kang produced a wide range of accessories using the chainmaille technique, such as rings, bracelets, necklaces and earrings. From the video he shared below, you can see that he is very well versed with it. What is impressive is that he picked it up from scratch on his own.

Recently, he also explored using cable ties in his accessories-making. When asked where he gets inspiration from, Kang said ideas just come along as he makes stuffs. How true!

Kang shares stuffs at the Instructables website too. For those of you who are not familiar, Instructables allow people to share with other people how they do things. It contains lots of wisdom put together by those who believe in the open source.

Kang shared that theKANG is his full time endeavour, and he has been doing this for about a year. Check out his website and Facebook Page too.

Interested to speak with Kang personally? Find him at his booth at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 at SCAPE Warehouse on 27 & 28 July.

Yarns, bags and dolls – A different take on making

There were many maker booths at the inaugural Singapore Mini Maker Faire last year but Ling Ling’s booth stood out from the rest because her projects were of a different nature from the majority of the other showcases. Instead of electronics and robotics stuffs, Ling Ling was showcasing her beautifully crocheted bags and gothic dolls.

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I was excited to know that Ling Ling is returning because I am an innate craft lover and I am drawn to anything crafty. Hence, I was very curious what she will be showing this time round. It turned out that Ling Ling intended to run a workshop on top of showcasing her work at a booth! Read on to find out the motivation behind her return to the Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

Why the return

I sensed a lot of enthusiasm in Ling Ling when she replied my question on what made her return as a maker (even when it was over email). It seemed like a redundant question that I need not have asked. Ling Ling shared that she is a big fan of the MAKE Magazine and the Maker Faire so she is really keen to be involved. She was also kind to mention that the organisers have been very supportive, helpful and genuinely passionate about crafts and making things. *big smile*

Experience in the inaugural Singapore Mini Maker Faire

When asked about her experience last year, Ling Ling mentioned the good turnout despite being away from the city area. She noticed that people were very interested in the activity workshops, especially the kids. Hence, this year, she was inspired to run her own workshop! *yippee*

However, Ling Ling also observed that the MAKE Magazine’s main audience in Singapore seems to be the engineering and science community – circuits and programming kits, rather than the textile crafts. This was lacking in the maker representation in the inaugural Faire, hence she hopes to see more crafters join in this year, and a bigger section for textile and fibre arts. Indeed, this was something that the organising team realised as well, and are making efforts to improve. :)

One takeway from last year’s Faire for Ling Ling was the network with other fellow makers, who continued to connect online, at Maker Meetups and similar events. So, if you have been a lone maker who would like to know more like-minded people, why not drop by this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire?

Advice to newcomers

Lastly, here is a word of advice from Ling Ling to all newcomers at this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

Join us if you’re passionate about crafts and sharing your passion… And just enjoy the atmosphere and camaraderie! It’s a positive spirit and something we really need here in Singapore.”

Ling Ling’s passion for crafts and the Maker Faire drives us as well, and we hope to bring in more makers from different background and expertise so that there can be more sharing and learning through exchanges between makers.

If you are interested in the previous blog we had posted about Ling Ling, you can read about it here. Her works can also be found here.

Update: Ling Ling will be conducting an “Intro to Crochet for Beginners” on 28 Jul, 12.45pm – 1.30pm, at SCAPE Level 4 (Colony Room).

Fee: $8/participant (Includes yarn and one crochet hook)
No pre-registration required, slots on a first-come-first-served basis.  Please make payment at the SMMF Counter at the Colony to confirm your slot.

Gearing up with the harmonograph

It is coming to half a year since the inaugural Singapore Mini Maker Faire which was held on 4 & 5 August last year at Science Centre Singapore. So, what have all the makers been doing in this half a year? What projects have everybody been doing? It would be great if you could share them with us.

To start the ball rolling, we will share what some students under the club “Singapore Academy of Young Engineers and Scientists (SAYES)” have been tinkering with in the month of December.

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The harmonograph

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Drawing of a harmonograph

Want to try your hands on it as well? The harmonograph they built will be set up for the first time in public on 19 January 2013 at Fort Canning as part of the Handmade Movement Singapore’s Indie Craft Fair and you are free to express your drawing creativity with this specially designed paper!

Harmonograph drawing on Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 design paper

Harmonograph drawing on Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 design paper

So, come look for us at Fort Canning Green and Patio, 52 Canning Rise, this coming Saturday!

RS Components: DesignSpark – Demonstrating the Raspberry Pi!

DesignSpark by RS Components is a progressive engineering community dedicated to providing an interactive outlet to the engineering world that will be featured at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire this year!

About DesignSpark

DesignSpark is an online engineering community sponsored by RS Components that provides a gateway to online resources and design support for engineers. Created two years ago, DesignSpark.com is an interactive environment for all types of engineers to express their ideas, share their knowledge, and learn from others. Upon free registration to this conducive community, one also has free access to the award winning PCB Design Tool, thousands of free 3D models, and the eTech (a digital and tablet edition electronics magazine), all of which will be featured at DesignSpark’s Mini Maker Faire booth and workshop, so be sure to check out these free DIY tools to amplify your engineering experience!

Raspberry Pi: A Demonstration

The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized bare board that operates many of the functions of a PC, featured by RS Components DesignSpark. Add a keyboard, a mouse, and plug it into a TV, and then it functions just like a basic computer! These days, with society’s ever progressive technology it is almost impossible to see the computer at its bare working basics; however, the Raspberry Pi allows us to take bring technology back about 20 years to its bare essentials. Aspiring engineers everywhere are now able to learn about computer programming interactively—using the Raspberry Pi system, students are able to program their own codes and see how the computer responds to them. It’s all about discovering the world of computers in its most simplistic and beneficial form! DesignSpark will be demonstrating the Raspberry Pi at the Mini Maker Faire, so stop by at the faire to check out this new and innovative way to learn engineering!

DesignSpark is Amplifying Ideas

Upon speaking with the members of the DesignSpark community, I found the organization to be very dynamic—DesignSpark is dedicated in inspiring engineers to fuel their passion and in turning ideas into realities. In both their booth and workshop, they will demonstrate how their free design tools, such as the DesignSpark PCB and the 3D cad model can help makers turn their conceptual ideas into a concrete design. The tools DesignSpark is presenting will break the barriers in designing and spark new ideas for inspired makers everywhere! Currently, DesignSpark is working on the DesignSpark PCB verion 4, which will be the introduction of industry open source hardware platform to its community members. DesignSpark is certainly enthusiastic about sharing knowledge and creativity to help the maker community of Singapore thrive!

Making Animated Paper-craft with Wireless Inductive Power Transmission

“Support our friend, Zhu Kening, presenting his techno paper craft at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire!”, someone tweeted.

So, who is Zhu Kening, and what is this techno paper craft his friend/supporter mentioned?

We interview Zhu Kening and feature him as our next Maker of the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2012.

I thought it was a joke about a dancing paper initially but it turned out that I was wrong. It is really a dancing paper. To be more precise, the project is on paper-crafts such as origami or pop-up that can move through wireless inductive power transmission. I was totally awed by the description alone, and I was looking forward to meet up with the Maker for an interview, and to witness how this would be done.

About Zhu Ke Ning (also known as Ken)

Through my earlier email correspondences with Ken, Ken had shared that as a kid, he liked to dismantle things like radio sets, lamps, toys and re-assemble them together, build models and customise Tamiya racing cars. Ken gave credit to his father for cultivating his interest in DIY, by being a role model for him. Currently, Ken is a fourth year PhD student at the National University of Singapore and the “dancing paper-craft” is his research project this year. Ken enjoys working on exciting and crazy scientific ideas. As he enjoys building paper models and folding origami, he decided to incorporate them into his PhD research topic and try to make them move by itself like robots.

The Meeting

Maker Ken with his prototypes

William (Our in-house maker!) and I met up with Zhu Ke Ning, also known as Ken, at Keio-NUS CUTE Centre where he showed us his prototypes.

Ken showed us how the paper craft and inch worm can move, with the help of shape memory-alloys and an inductive power system that can power up the specific moving part of the paper-craft to generate movements. Check out his YouTube video of the moving paper craft and inch worm.When asked about his plans for this project, Ken shared that he would like to make this an open-source project. He would like to further improve on his prototype such that the power system could be made into a printed circuit board (PCB) that could be downloaded and used by others eventually.

Paper crane with shape-memory alloys

Inductive Power System underneath the glass table

 

 

 

 

The Presentation and Workshop

Ken would share the details in his presentation during the Singapore Mini Maker Faire and also conduct a workshop where participants can learn how to attach their shape-memory materials to paper-crafts and make them move. The attendees will learn how to make moving paper structure, such as crane, dog, inchworm, without any battery or direct power supply connection. More details about the moving paper craft and inchworm can also be found on Ken’s website at http://www.tech-ken.com/

Ken’s workshop is fully booked, but do come down for his presentation on Saturday 4 August, 3 pm!

Ken’s view on the Maker Scene in Singapore

Ken felt that the Maker/ DIY culture in Singapore is quite good, not only in high-tech areas but also in daily life. He sometimes see people making their own furniture, or fixing their house by themselves. He also saw children making their own cards when they want to play card games. He see it as a part of the Maker Culture.

According to Ken, to popularise the culture in Singapore, people have to switch their mentality, to have the desire to turn their ideas into reality, to want to solve their problem in a smart way, to dare to try and to learn to work with limited resources. Maker culture should be integrated into day to day life.

Ken also shared that there are many colleagues in his lab in NUS who are into DIY activities, and it is facilitated by the equipments available in the lab such as laser cutter and 3D printer because they can quickly prototype their ideas.

He felt that the Singapore Mini Maker Faire will be a good opportunity for interactions between Makers.

If you are keen to attend Ken’s workshop and hear his presentation, come for the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2012 on 4 & 5 August 2012! If you have your own paper craft which you would like to use for the workshop, Ken also welcome you to bring it along!

[Note: Target age group for the workshop would be 20 years old and above.]

Gothic Dolls and Handmade Accessories, Craft Punk Jewelry and Bags for Punks with a Sweet Tooth

What will you think of when you hear of Gothic Dolls? What if you add Punk accessories to Gothic Dolls?

 The visual can be quite impactful, isn’t it? What if all of these are handcrafted? Wow!

Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2012 introduces the next Maker on our list, Ng Ling Ling, a doll maker.

 

 Ling and her Dolls

Ling (http://www.etsy.com/shop/sugarpunk/about) began making dolls in 2007. Her first doll was a cloth doll version of Marilyn Manson. Since then, she has made numerous Goth and Punk dolls, branching out into Bunka dolls and other soft sculpture.

When asked why Ling makes her own dolls, she expressed that people who make their own toys tend not to toss them, unlike commercially made ones, because they would recognise the effort that has gone into making it as compared to just buying it off the shelves.

Handmade/re-purposed clothes and accessories

Ling feels the same for clothes and accessories. To Ling, making your own clothes and accessories similarly makes you appreciate them better. It is also this line of thought that encouraged her to re-purpose second-hand or unsold stock, making accessories out of waste materials, which is a form of hacking too! Ling acclaimed that she is a hoarder, with an enormous stash of yarn and textiles (but aren’t all crafters hoarders? :P) So, SugarPunk also stocks knitted purses and other sewn items, besides gothic items (adding sugar to the punk!).

Ultimately, Ling hopes to see consumers shift towards an appreciation of quality rather than quantity, citing the examples of better quality, hand-stitched Victorian or Edwardian clothes that are made to last.

Making materials from scratch

What interests me most was the fact that Ling also makes her own materials from scratch.

When I asked Ling for her views on the Maker community in Singapore, she expressed that she is aware of a large crafting community in SG but not many who makes materials from scratch, e.g casting their own jewellery pieces in resin, spinning, weaving etc probably due to the availability of raw materials. To Ling, being a crafter makes you think about the resources and human effort that goes into making things, for instance, weaving cloth or spinning yarn.

She has her own hand-spindle! She shared that she bought the hand-made drop spindle from Etsy and she is still learning how to use it. She shared that hand-spinning would give the yarn a nice hand-made feel as the yarn would not be even and would be more chunky. She intended to incorporate cloth strips, ribbons and threads – anything that can be twisted.

Why Ling is taking part in Singapore Mini Maker Faire

Ling shared that she visited the Maker Faire in NY City last year, and it was very exciting to meet so many Makers in person.

Having watched many videos of Maker Faires in other countries, I think I can understand how it can truly inspire a maker to want to show and share their work, and for a looker to become a maker.

Come join us on 4 & 5 August, and experience that excitement together with us. :)