Tag Archives: 3D printing

From traditional printing press to blinky circuits

Were you here with us at the Marquee, Science Centre Singapore for our first lead-up family workshop for the Singapore Mini Maker Faire last Saturday? It was an amazing array of activities and we hope you had managed to cover everything if you were here.

Check out some of the station activities that were arranged!
LED activities/ Using DIY remote buttons for Scratch software
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Learn about simple circuits by making a blingtastic circuit

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Sciencey games: Kendama
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Amaker3D: Open source 3D printing
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3D modelling and design with Henry Wong and Darren See
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Quilling and paper crafting with Priyanka Datta
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Solder your own wireframe models by Pan Yew
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Colour Me – by artist Richard Kearns
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Communicate your Science: a “Be a writer” talent hunt and children’s talk show, by Sindu Sreebhavan of Kids Parade Magazine
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If you had missed this workshop, no worries, there will be other opportunities. Do watch this space or follow us on our Singapore Mini Maker Faire Facebook Page! Remember to block your calendar for our actual Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2014 which will happen on 26 & 27 July 2014 at Senja-Cashew Community Club.

Kids can hack and make too!

Students who went to the Senja-Cashew Community Club on 4th and 5th January for their Edusave Merit Bursary Awards were pleasantly surprised to walk into a hall full of activities – and very unusual activities too.

Hackidemia (4-5 Jan 14)In one corner, 3D printers were humming, printing what kids doodled on the app – doodle 3D. Kids were walking around with 3D printed flowers, butterflies and even their names. Other children took their first foray into making with electronics as they tried out Hackidemia SG’s classic offerings – Vibrobots, Zombie Signalizers and Little Bits.

Parents stood back and watched, proud and at the same time apprehensive, as kids as young as 4 tried wielding a saw and mallet at the woodworking station. Makers from different parts of Singapore and different walks of life came together with a singular goal – to instill the value of hands-on making to parents and the empowerment it gives to young children who delight in the simple pleasure of seeing and loving what they have made with their own hands.

Check out the video uploaded at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire Facebook Page!

The maker roadshow at Senja Cashew Community Club was jointly organized by Science Centre Singapore, Singapore Mini Maker Faire, Hackidemia Singapore, Silicon Straits, Simplify3D, Sustainable living Lab and Senja-Cashew Community Club, leading up to the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2014 later on this year.

This blog entry has been contributed by Dr Kiruthika Ramanathan, Science Centre Singapore.

Connecting the 3D printing enthusiasts with suitable printing services

Benjamin Yeo is the founder of sourcemake.com, an online platform which aims to help those without 3D printers find one that fits their budget and time constraints. We interviewed the person behind this portal and uncover his motivation behind this initiative – Benjamin Yeo.

Benjamin felt that he is more of a consumer / prosumer that likes experimenting and hacking, rather than a maker per se. As a parent of 2 young boys and an advocate of the style of kinethestic learning, he loves exploring ideas to expose them to new ways of learning and play.

Benjamin shared that he got more serious in the area of 3D printing about a year ago, when prices of 3D printers began to dip quite a bit. He backed a 3D printer project on Kickstarter earlier this year, with the hope of designing custom made toys and working on other 3D projects with his older boy. He believes that through building and modelling structures, his son can be exposed to design concepts in his early years so that he can better appreciate the different math and sciences disciplines in his subsequent schooling years, rather than face them as mere examinable subjects. But unfortunately, the 3D printer project that he backed has delayed its delivery till now.

With no printer available, Benjamin turned to outsourcing the printing of his projects to commercial 3D printing service providers, only to discover it to be costly and time consuming for maker projects of his scale. In view of that, he decided that the best option would be to find a non-commercial 3D printer owner who can helped him in printing at the right time and requirements. With the help of peers in the maker community, he managed to find a 3D printing hobbyist who was helpful enough to collaborate with him. He also noted that 3D printer owners who helped in such projects would be able to get more proficient in their craft or even monetize their expertise through providing such printing services. Through these interactions, he discovered that there is a benefit in having a centralised platform where 3D printing enthusiasts worldwide can connect with other experts to get their printing jobs done. Just think “Zuji” for 3D printing services, where anyone with a 3D printer can be part of that platform and print for others at the right price, time and quality.

sourcemake.com is currently at its conceptual and development stage. If there is enough traction to keep the community going, he sees potential for it to grow into a platform where there would be more interactions and connections between 3D printing novices and experts worldwide, accelerating the democratisation of 3D printing activity and contributing to the global maker culture.

Benjamin will be sharing his story for sourcemake.com at the 3D printing forum on 28 Jul (10am – 2.30pm), where he will be part of a panel to discuss and share about trends and issues concerning 3D printing. If you have signed up for this forum, remember it will take place at Gallery Room, *SCAPE Level 5.

3D printing team inspired from the inaugural Singapore Mini Maker Faire

As many of you would know, there will be a 3D printing forum this year to facilitate conversations and discussions about a subject which is not totally new, but had definitely caught on a lot of attention in recent years.

The Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 would next introduce a two-men team who came together into a 3D printing endeavour and their efforts in the local 3D printing scene – Hanyang Leong and Jerett Koh (Funbie Studios).

About Funbie Studios

It is always interesting to learn how the Maker Faire has inspired individuals. It was revealed to us that Funbie Studios was formed shortly after Hanyang and Jerett checked out the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2012 and got interested in 3D printing, its flexibility and potential, especially in terms of collaborations.

That actually began their relatively new adventure in 3D printing, working off their 6-month old Makerbot Replicator 2, exploring prints off open source designs and coming up with their own designs.

Funbie Team

Funbie Team with their Makerbot Replicator 2

They shared that at the beginning, they will take designs from Thingiverse to test print, while they familiarise themselves with their printer and start to come up with their own designs such as a namecard holder, a CD stem to hold a CD in place on the table, and even a detailed design of a rickshaw. They use a range of designing programmes, from basic ones like SketchUp, Blender, AutoDesk 123D and Sculptris to more comprehensive tools such as Rhino3D and sometimes Processing for code-generated 3D models. Mainly, Funbie Studios focus more on collaborative projects with a design focus.

Check out their designs they shared at Thingiverse here. To Funbie Studios, sharing their designs is a way to contribute back to the online community that has helped them start up. Kudos to the team!

Their views of the local 3D printing scene and way forward

Funbie Studios remarked that 3D printing has become a hot topic lately and is being watched closely by many. They have many aspirations for the way forward.

Besides design work, Funbie Studios is active in gathering the community to come together to work with and learn from one another. This explained why they organise the bi-monthly Singapore 3D Printing Meetup to provide like-minded people with the platform to come together, share what they have been up to, enhance their knowledge in this area, and also to introduce this technology to the less initiated. One recently took place on 11 July and we heard that the response was overwhelming! This was why they were enthusiastic towards the idea of the 3D printing forum that will take place on the second day of this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

On the educational front, Funbie Studios have also been engaging students not only from the tertiary level, but also from the Secondary and Primary level! So 3D printing is going to schools too!

Multicolour cogvase that will be showcased this weekend!

Multicolour cogvase that will be showcased this weekend!

Funbie Studios has also been reaching out to work with others in the 3D printing field and the maker community to explore collaborative opportunities. Funbie Studios shared that they have been working with Shapeways (a 3D printing marketplace) and will be representing them with a booth at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire as well.

In time to come, they are also looking to create a Makerspace which is equipped with a whole suite of tools to allow the community to gather, learn from one another, make stuff and have fun in the process!

If you are keen to speak with Hanyang and Jerett from Funbie Studios, drop by their booth at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 at SCAPE Warehouse on 27 & 28 Jul! Hanyang will also be part of the panel for the 3D printing forum on 28 Jul, 10am – 2.30pm. Do pre-register if you are keen to join in!