Tag Archives: prototyping

3D printing team inspired from the inaugural Singapore Mini Maker Faire

As many of you would know, there will be a 3D printing forum this year to facilitate conversations and discussions about a subject which is not totally new, but had definitely caught on a lot of attention in recent years.

The Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 would next introduce a two-men team who came together into a 3D printing endeavour and their efforts in the local 3D printing scene – Hanyang Leong and Jerett Koh (Funbie Studios).

About Funbie Studios

It is always interesting to learn how the Maker Faire has inspired individuals. It was revealed to us that Funbie Studios was formed shortly after Hanyang and Jerett checked out the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2012 and got interested in 3D printing, its flexibility and potential, especially in terms of collaborations.

That actually began their relatively new adventure in 3D printing, working off their 6-month old Makerbot Replicator 2, exploring prints off open source designs and coming up with their own designs.

Funbie Team

Funbie Team with their Makerbot Replicator 2

They shared that at the beginning, they will take designs from Thingiverse to test print, while they familiarise themselves with their printer and start to come up with their own designs such as a namecard holder, a CD stem to hold a CD in place on the table, and even a detailed design of a rickshaw. They use a range of designing programmes, from basic ones like SketchUp, Blender, AutoDesk 123D and Sculptris to more comprehensive tools such as Rhino3D and sometimes Processing for code-generated 3D models. Mainly, Funbie Studios focus more on collaborative projects with a design focus.

Check out their designs they shared at Thingiverse here. To Funbie Studios, sharing their designs is a way to contribute back to the online community that has helped them start up. Kudos to the team!

Their views of the local 3D printing scene and way forward

Funbie Studios remarked that 3D printing has become a hot topic lately and is being watched closely by many. They have many aspirations for the way forward.

Besides design work, Funbie Studios is active in gathering the community to come together to work with and learn from one another. This explained why they organise the bi-monthly Singapore 3D Printing Meetup to provide like-minded people with the platform to come together, share what they have been up to, enhance their knowledge in this area, and also to introduce this technology to the less initiated. One recently took place on 11 July and we heard that the response was overwhelming! This was why they were enthusiastic towards the idea of the 3D printing forum that will take place on the second day of this year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

On the educational front, Funbie Studios have also been engaging students not only from the tertiary level, but also from the Secondary and Primary level! So 3D printing is going to schools too!

Multicolour cogvase that will be showcased this weekend!

Multicolour cogvase that will be showcased this weekend!

Funbie Studios has also been reaching out to work with others in the 3D printing field and the maker community to explore collaborative opportunities. Funbie Studios shared that they have been working with Shapeways (a 3D printing marketplace) and will be representing them with a booth at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire as well.

In time to come, they are also looking to create a Makerspace which is equipped with a whole suite of tools to allow the community to gather, learn from one another, make stuff and have fun in the process!

If you are keen to speak with Hanyang and Jerett from Funbie Studios, drop by their booth at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013 at SCAPE Warehouse on 27 & 28 Jul! Hanyang will also be part of the panel for the 3D printing forum on 28 Jul, 10am – 2.30pm. Do pre-register if you are keen to join in!

Just another 3D printer? No, it is slightly different this time.

Introducing next is another repeat maker from last year’s Singapore Mini Maker Faire – Wee Kiam Peng.

If you cannot recall who he was, he is the person behind Orangeknob and the portable self-replicating 3D printer “Portabee”.

The whole idea of having a portable 3D printer at a fairly reasonable price was so appealing then that I was actually considering to get one of them for myself. And maybe still contemplating. :P

Advice

When approached to give some words of advice to people new to the making culture, Kiam Peng amazed me with his super fast response. Every single answer was sharp and straight to the point.

Kiam Peng shared that he had signed up again as maker this year because of his passion for making. Interestingly, he described last year’s Mini Maker Faire as “crazy” but in a positive way. It was meeting a lot of like-minded folks that made it “crazy” for him. I guess he must have found himself being approached to find out more about his 3D printer most of the time.  He felt that the Singapore Mini Maker Faire does help encourage the maker movement and the interest in 3D printing here in Singapore. In fact, he highlighted that every little steps help. How true indeed!

As repeat makers, Kiam Peng expressed interest to see a greater variety of DIY items. I guess this would always be something that most makers like to see – “to inspire and be inspired”.

Hence, Kiam Peng urged all makers to be more forthcoming, to dare to show the world that you are creative and that you can make a difference.

New plans

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Sneak peak!

We were excited when we hear of the giant 3D printer that Orangeknob is going to showcase.

How big would it be? What kind of prototypes can it print? I believe many people at the upcoming Mini Maker Faire will be similarly curious about it.

Ideas and possibilities never fail to bring up the spirit in people. Does the sound of this giant printer perk you up a bit and ignite your interest?

To learn more about Orangeknob’s latest project, check them out at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2013, coming to you on 27 & 28 July at SCAPE.

If you are keen to read more about how Orangeknob was formed, read our blog entry last year here.

RS Components: DesignSpark – Demonstrating the Raspberry Pi!

DesignSpark by RS Components is a progressive engineering community dedicated to providing an interactive outlet to the engineering world that will be featured at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire this year!

About DesignSpark

DesignSpark is an online engineering community sponsored by RS Components that provides a gateway to online resources and design support for engineers. Created two years ago, DesignSpark.com is an interactive environment for all types of engineers to express their ideas, share their knowledge, and learn from others. Upon free registration to this conducive community, one also has free access to the award winning PCB Design Tool, thousands of free 3D models, and the eTech (a digital and tablet edition electronics magazine), all of which will be featured at DesignSpark’s Mini Maker Faire booth and workshop, so be sure to check out these free DIY tools to amplify your engineering experience!

Raspberry Pi: A Demonstration

The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized bare board that operates many of the functions of a PC, featured by RS Components DesignSpark. Add a keyboard, a mouse, and plug it into a TV, and then it functions just like a basic computer! These days, with society’s ever progressive technology it is almost impossible to see the computer at its bare working basics; however, the Raspberry Pi allows us to take bring technology back about 20 years to its bare essentials. Aspiring engineers everywhere are now able to learn about computer programming interactively—using the Raspberry Pi system, students are able to program their own codes and see how the computer responds to them. It’s all about discovering the world of computers in its most simplistic and beneficial form! DesignSpark will be demonstrating the Raspberry Pi at the Mini Maker Faire, so stop by at the faire to check out this new and innovative way to learn engineering!

DesignSpark is Amplifying Ideas

Upon speaking with the members of the DesignSpark community, I found the organization to be very dynamic—DesignSpark is dedicated in inspiring engineers to fuel their passion and in turning ideas into realities. In both their booth and workshop, they will demonstrate how their free design tools, such as the DesignSpark PCB and the 3D cad model can help makers turn their conceptual ideas into a concrete design. The tools DesignSpark is presenting will break the barriers in designing and spark new ideas for inspired makers everywhere! Currently, DesignSpark is working on the DesignSpark PCB verion 4, which will be the introduction of industry open source hardware platform to its community members. DesignSpark is certainly enthusiastic about sharing knowledge and creativity to help the maker community of Singapore thrive!

Come experience being a Kampung Maker!

Sixteen makers and 6 discovery zones with an interesting myriad of hands-on activities! – This is my brief introduction of the booths of the Sustainable Living Lab (SL2) at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2012.

Looking forward to see the cool stuffs that the SL2 makers are going to showcase? Come check it out with me for a sneak preview now!

About Sustainable Living Lab (SL2)

The Sustainable Living Lab (SL2) is Singapore’s first semi-outdoor kampung (village) lab and prototyping facility that enables local innovators, organisations and students to serve their communities and the bottom-of-the-pyramid better. SL2 is located at the Sustainable Living Kampung, a space created by Ground-Up Initiative (GUI), a non-profit community in Bottle Tree Park in Yishun.

Meet the Makers

Ibnur – SL2’s co-founder. A community-oriented innovator at GUI, Ibnur believes in the kampung spirit of ground-up innovation to solve sustainability challenges. He had been a maker/inventor since a tender age, having been influenced by his grandparents and parents whom he cited as “amazing individuals [who] have been the fountains from which [his] ideas flow from and also reminders for [him] to serve greater purposes in life”. His engineering education also provided the opportunities for several of his inventing and prototyping experiences such as antennas, sensors, filters, food dryers, bio-chips and ‘invisibility cloaks’ (Urgh, don’t we all think of Harry Potter when we hear “invisibility cloaks”?) 

Ibnur, together with Veera (below), had worked on projects that tackled issues in rural India, winning him UNESCO-Daimler Mondialogo Engineering Awards. Striving to nurture innovation across villages, he now co-leads the Sustainable Living Lab (SL2).

Veera – SL2’s co-founder. Veera has been making knickknacks and doodads for as along as he can remember. A kampung tinkerer at Ground-Up Initiative (GUI), his maker journey started with Meccano and Lego kits. Taking up Design & Technology as an O Level subject, he had ample opportunities to hone his skills in wood and metal working which served him well as a Mechanical Engineer in the National University of Singapore (NUS) where he designed and built solar pond dryers, flying wind turbines and miniature toothpick furniture.  Like Ibnur, Veera spent some time in the Silicon Valley gaining him valuable exposure to the overseas “garage culture”. On returning to Singapore, he co-founded the Sustainable Living Lab with like-minded maker buddies to develop the kampung culture of innovation in Singapore.

Huei Ming – SL2’s co-founder. Huei Ming is also presently a teaching assistant for the Engineering Science Programme at NUS where he is implementing a new design project for engineering students to construct their own low cost scanning tunnelling microscopes and guiding students on existing engineering design projects involving the fabrication of microfluidic devices and constructing wi-fi antennas.

There are 13 other makers (Zi Jing, Eugene, Yoga, Lianhan, Bart, Robin, Poh Hong, Melanie, Sullivan, Sid, Joyce, Natalie and Leonard) who all have a nice profile each created under the SL2 website (http://www.sl2square.org/category/news/singapore-mini-maker-faire/). Do check them out and see if you can spot them during the Faire this weekend!

What are they showcasing?

SL2 will be bringing some of the coolest stuff made by their kampung innovators out from their lab in Yishun. This includes bamboo amplifiers for the iPhone (which had an interesting name of iBam and iBam2), keychains & luggage tags made from decommissioned fire hoses, awesome cardboard sculptures put together by their cardboard designer extraordinaire, Bartholomew Ting, cool flatpacked cardboard furniture, cardboard building blocks, home brew kampung fitness equipment, water rockets and even PET bottle gardens and novel home gardening systems. You can even try out some tools and equipment at their mini wood working shop.

“MAKE” Cardboard Sculpture (Photo credit: SL2 Facebook page)

 SL2 is also promising interesting workshops to make your own play-dough, catapult, mini building blocks, water rockets, compost and cardboard sculptures which will engage your mind, body and soul!And that is not the end, as SL2 brings in games that would incorporate these DIY toys. I can already visualise lots of excited children!

Advice

SL2’s founding team was very humble when we asked them for advice for budding makers. They felt that their team is still young, and they do not have much wisdom yet to share as they are still walking the Maker path.

However, they shared 3 maxims which they live by and practised in one form or another at the Sustainable Living Lab (SL2):

Firstly, “If it ain’t fun, it ain’t right.” Secondly, “No prototype, no talk.” And, lastly, “Don’t just make your product, make your story.”

Maker Scene in Singapore

On the maker scene in Singapore, they would like to believe that there are many others in Singapore who share similar aspirations, as they felt that Singapore is in dire need of makers who are creative, hands-on and take risks, so as to build a Singapore that is vibrant, dynamic yet responsible and sustainable. The Maker scene is still young, so they do not know of many yet. They hope that through the involvement in the Singapore Mini Maker Faire, they could get to know more amazing ground-up innovators.

They added that our local maker scene can be likened to a baby Pheonix hatchling. It is not something new in Singapore, but more as something lost in our present young generation that is now in revival. They felt that it is important to rebuild the hands-on culture which was common in the days of our grandparents, where the kampong spirit prevails, where people spend more time together outdoor doing meaningful stuffs together.

To stay tuned to the SL2 stories, check out their Facebook pages on: www.facebook.com/sl2square and www.facebook.com/groundupinitiative. But first and foremost, come by the Singapore Mini Maker Faire at Science Centre Singapore this weekend (4 & 5 August).

Introducing the Portabee – You can now have your own 3D printer and bring it along everywhere!

First of all, if you have not heard of a 3D printer, it is a mechanism which allows you to print 3D stuffs (as the name suggests). What is different about the Portabee DIY 3D printer is that it is light at 2.8kg and can easily collapse in a matter of seconds and fits into a laptop bag, making it transportable anywhere! Get that visual image in your mind?

Portabee

In an interview, Kiam Peng from Orangeknob shares with us more.

 How they got started

 It all started as a project to make it easier for them make 3D prototypes. Kiam Peng and his partners have been tinkering with electronics and musical-related stuffs such as electronic drum machines and effect pedals but they were at a discovery stage. However, when 3D printing came along, the initial plans were all shelved. They had bought a Thing-o-Matic, an automatic 3D printer by MakerBot. They then realised that Thing-o-Matic is associated with open source products and it inspired them to make a reprap. A reprap is short for Replicating Rapid Prototypers. Their intention was to make something that is more self-replicating, i.e. allowing the making of components which can be assembled into another DIY 3D printer. Voila! The rest is up to your imagination.

We were told that Orangeknob took about 9 months to be able to release their first printer, the Durbie. In that process, they faced challenges of a 9-to-5 job, getting support from people around them etc. The process might be difficult but it must also be rewarding for the Makers to see the fruits of their hard work.

 What will they be sharing

During the upcoming Singapore Mini Maker Faire on 4 & 5 August, Orangeknob will be managing a booth, workshops and presentations.

 At their booth, they will showcase their printers (Durbie, Portabee, Portabee-x) and some of their printed parts.

If you would like to have your own DIY 3D printer, get one before the Mini Maker Faire and learn how to assemble it during the workshop that they will be conducting there.

 They are also excited to share their experiences in coming up with such a gadget during their presentation, despite being “not very comfortable with public speaking”, according to Kiam Peng. They will share on how they went in the open source direction into the world of DIY 3D printing, the challenges they face and their future projects.

Encouraging Makers in Singapore

Kiam Peng shared that they were not aware of a Maker culture in Singapore. They were focusing more on the international markets but slowly meet more people and realised there are people who owned CNC machines and printers at home. They felt that technological advances had already brought down the cost of prototyping, and that the cost of a 3D printer is approaching the cost of a laser/ink printer! I find myself nodding in agreement. The thought is exhilarating!

Kiam Peng felt that the maker culture will spread as more people do it, in view of our close proximity with one another. We certainly hope so too!

Orangeknob is now working towards producing big printers and other niche printers. To learn more about them, check them out at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire 2012, coming to you in 2 days at the Science Centre Singapore.