Arduino for you ?

Come and find out what the Arduino is, what it can do, why is it so popular and much more.
In a sentence, the Arduino is a programmable controller that lets you control electronic devices (like LEDs) to perform tasks (like turning on the lights when someone is present).

Schools use Arduino to teach science, programming and electronics in a fun way. Tertiary students use it for their final year projects to show-case concepts. People leverage on its readily available resources to build their own electronic gadgets.
SGduino
We will be showing Arduino projects that you can build, as well as different types and sizes of Arduino that you may want to consider using for your own projects. We will also be showcasing the SGuino, the First Arduino designed and produced in Singapore targeted at Young Makers.

You may want to check out the article at the following link which gives a brief introduction to the Arduino. (http://blog.3egadgets.com/?p=309)

“Fix it, Give it” – A project by the Singapore Academy of Young Engineers and Scientists (SAYES)

Good Karma ToyThe Singapore Academy of Young Engineers and Scientists (SAYES) will be embarking on a “Fix It, Give It” project to collect unwanted toys and work with volunteers to give the toys a new lease of life. The toys will be donated to one of the children’s home in Singapore.

A collection box will be set up at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire at Senja-Cashew CC (at the registration booth). If you have mechanical or electronic toys which are spoiled and you would like to contribute them towards this meaningful cause, SAYES would like to appeal to you to bring them down to us this weekend. A very big THANK YOU to you in advance!

If you have any enquiries about the project, please email to sayes@science.edu.sg.

Introducing Dr James Grieve and the Singapore Homebrew Club

Next, we would like to introduce Dr James Grieve, a maker from an interesting hobby group, The Singapore Homebrew Club. At the Singapore Mini Maker Faire, James intends to share with visitors an overview of the homebrewing experience here in Singapore, the challenges faced and the technological solutions that members of the group came up with to overcome those challenges.

Dr James Grieve. The Singapore Homebrew Club. The Brew

James is a Scientist at the Centre for Quantum Technologies. He shared that at work, he mixes high powered laser systems with single-photon counting experiments. After work, he messes up his apartment brewing beer and wine, as well as playing with more unusual fermentations like kefir, kombucha and yoghurt cultures. He joined the Singapore Homebrew Club sometime in 2013.

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A “brew in a bag” (BIAB) mashing set-up, with a bimetalic dial thermometer used to check the mash temperature. The BIAB technique is a convenient way for homebrewers to get started with mashing as it needs minimal equipment — just a large pot, a decent hob or wok burner and a suitable mesh bag.

James shared that the Singapore Homebrew Club is a relatively young club which was formed in September 2012 by Mr Neo Say Wee (man behind www.homebrew.com.sg). It is a club where like-minded brewers gather to share their successes and improve their art. The club’s original handful of members have now grown to more than 80, with their regular monthly meet-ups swelling to over 40 participants. During the gatherings, the members will bring along their brew (prepared earlier according to the theme of that gathering). They will conduct a blind tasting of these beers and review them through written feedback. Each month, there will be around 8 – 12 types of brew prepared by the members who attend the session. James also shared that the members of the club are welcoming and have not turned away any brew before. So, if you are a keen home brewer, check out their club!

When asked whether there had been any brew that excited the club, James mentioned that there had been several showcase of memorable beers in the past, but it’s often the unusual ones that stand out the most. He recalled a “sour beer” which was brewed by one of the Club members for their monthly meet-up. This style of beer, originally produced from Belgium, had apparently gained popularity worldwide and a club member accidentally brewed a version of it (fermented at room temperature with a variety of yeasts (and bacteria) from unusual sources, even some wild ones) and it took the member just a few weeks! James noted that this was pretty unusual because the brew usually require a prolonged aging period for the flavours to meld and for it to be palatable. Sounds like this is a lot of experimental fun!

Apart from the more formal tasting session, the club also hold talks and more social events at time, eg. barbecues or brew-alongs. Beyond the club gatherings, members also enter their beers into the locally run iBrew Challenge each year! However, the current challenge of the club would be to find suitable meet-up places for the growing club. Well, I guess that might be a happy problem!

Participation at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire

As some of the club’s members are active in the local Maker community, and were due to participate in SMMF via the CQT stall, the idea of introducing homebrew brewed (pun intended!).

The team hopes to give people an insight into the work that goes into producing the world’s most popular fermented beverage, and perhaps also to pass on their enthusiasm in homebrew. At their booth, the Homebrew club members will run an ongoing demonstration of “yeast starters” – a process whereby you grow up a large population of yeast cells to pitch into your fermenter — onto their home-made magnetic stir plates. If logistics allow, they also plan to do a couple of “mini mashes” to show how they extract fermentable sugars from malted grains, and have brewers to talk about hacking kitchen appliances, adapting and splicing recipes, yeast ranching and other techniques they have tried.

Curious to learn about the Singapore Homebrew Club? Come by the Singapore Mini Maker Faire on 26 & 27 July or check out their website http://www.meetup.com/Singapore-Homebrew/

Shi En, a student maker from SUTD

Shi En, a student from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), will be taking part as a maker in the Singapore Mini Maker Faire for the first time this year and he shared with us how he actually got started.

He shared that he enjoys 3D printing, electronics, robotics, and the use of machines, and he picked up these hobbies about 2 years ago. The following are some projects he had made since then. Interesting, aren’t they?

An angrShi Eny bird:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6g5rJyWopmw

8x8x8 led cube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTD9yQ7yu48

Light dance:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRaF-TAy54M

Shi En first attended the Faire last year as a visitor. Earlier this year, he responded to our call for makers for lead-up events and took part at our first pop-up event at Tampines Central CC to teach participants about paper circuits. By participating as a maker this year, he wishes to inspire others to start their own projects and also get to know other makers in the maker movement.

That’s the spirit, Shi En, and we hope you get to inspire many through this weekend’s event!

(Sponsor’s Blog) Evernote Maker Series: Building Robots with Evernote

(Cross-posted from Evernote Blog)

In celebration in our participation at the Singapore Mini Maker Faire, this week we’ll be publishing a series of blog post telling awesome Maker stories building and making stuff using Evernote.

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Grace Chia is a student in Singapore. Together with a team that comprises of more than 12 students who reads Electrical, Computer, Mechanical Engineering, as well Computer Systems, project BumbleBee Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was founded. The objective of the project was to build an underwater robot that could perform tasks by only relying on its software and sensors.

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Building a robot from scratch and working with such a big team was definitely not an easy task as there were many different ideas and various logistics that needed to be consolidated. With the help of Evernote Business, Grace and her team have finally achieved first success with their underwater robot.

Evernote – connecting ideas

Creating a network of ideas

The AUV has many sensors, actuators, electrical boards and connections. Across the 4 different subteams of Mechanical, Electrical, Software and PR, there is overwhelming amounts of information which is almost impossible to manage without Evernote. Evernote helps Grace and her team connect ideas and keep track of each team’s progress. They’ll put down the research they’ve found to share with the different teams and even pen down Reminders to keep track of where they’re heading.

Simplifying Search

Since the project comprises of different teams with varied capabilities and knowledge, the search function from Evernote works magic for the teams as it makes it easy for different members to learn more about their teammate’s work by entering a simple term he knows off his head.

The Related Notes feature also intelligently suggests some notes which may be relevant when a member is working on an idea. This prevents any overlapping of ideas or activities and also promotes continuity of the project. Any new additions to the team can now review related notes as he/she pens down his considerations or doubts.

Administration work no longer a hassle

Finance as a shared responsibility

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Grace and her team have an entire notebook that is filled with electronic receipts and pegged to the very top of the list is a full Purchases Excel Sheet where members add in all their purchases. It allows the entire team to be kept updated about their individual expenses. This helps inculcate a sense of individual responsibility towards the project spending and also helps avoid overspending.

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Snap and share

Being students with no fixed work-desks, Grace and her team have meetings everywhere. Evernote comes in handy by allowing them to upload snapshots or materials over a variety of platforms. When using white-boards, they’ll snap a picture using their mobile phones and have it sync-ed to Evernote on their Windows laptops or iPads. Besides, Evernote recognizes handwriting in images too.

Staying on the same page

For a greater outreach effect, Grace and her team are working on creating their very own Evernote Brochure on-the-go where all members can have access to publicity materials.

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Sponsors logos in all sizes, individual agreements as well as sponsorship mileage are uploaded into this notebook for quicker referencing. To gain access to places and to tackle registration issues, the team details list is also available on Evernote, making it a one-stop for all information required by the project members.

Have you used Evernote to make?

Have you heard of Tatting?

Joyce Lim is a cardmaker, jeweller and tatter. She started selling her own handmade Christmas cards in 1998 to her office colleagues and later proceed to sell her own range of handmade jewellery at markets and bazaars.In 2011, Joyce self published her first tatting book – Tatted Lace Patterns. In the following year, she decided to turn her hobbies into a full-time enterprise. We conducted an interview with Joyce to find out more about tatting.

So, what is tatting?

Clover DollieTatting is almost unheard of in many parts of the world. Also known as shuttle lace, it uses shuttle and thread to make jewellery, dollies, bookmarks, edgings, collars, table runners, motifs, handphone charms/strap and more. Sometimes beads are used to create interesting effect or to enhance a design. The end product can be used to adorn clothings, decorate and beautify the house, create fashion/hair accessories, doll up your pets or make a gift for someone special.

Tatting provides good training for left and right hand coordination. It has also been used in occupational therapy to keep convalescent patients’ hands and minds active during recovery, as documented, in Betty MacDonald’s “The Plague and I”.

How did you get started?

I came across tatting in a craft shop in the late 1990s and I signed up for the class immediately. I first taught tatting in 2000 but had to stop due to work commitment. I continue to tat over the years and started teaching again in 2009. My classes are mostly in small groups of 2-8 participants so that I can give each participant enough attention.

How did you learn about the Singapore Mini Maker Faire? 

I read about it on someone’s Facebook post last year but the event was already over. My friend was invited to participate this year. Knowing that I am actively looking out for suitable events to participate, he forwarded the message to me. This will be the first time I participate in the Singapore Mini Maker Faire.

As this is my full time job now I hope to create an awareness for my products and services, not only among the public but organisations as well (classes and corporate greeting cards), and eventually be able to make a living out of it.

Workshops at Singapore Mini Maker Faire

Are you keen to learn tatting? Joyce will be conducting two sessions of workshops during the event at Senja-Cashew CC (26 July, 1.45pm and 27 July, 1.30pm) at $35/ person, and a presentation about tatting on 26 July, 4.10pm. Online registration for workshops: https://www.regonline.sg/smmfWorkshops

If you are interested to find out more about Joyce and her tatting venture, you can check out Joyce’s website http://www.uniqcreations4u.com and drop by her booth and speak with her.

About Ms Chang Wei Mun and her DIY Cake Toppers and Wooden Dolls

LCLMakerFaire2014Ms Chang Wei Mun, one of the co-founders of Little Craft Loft, will be conducting a workshop on how to make cake toppers and wooden dolls on 27 July (Sunday), 3.15pm to 4.45pm at Senja Cashew Community Club. Check out this interview with Wei Mun to learn more about her and Little Craft Loft.

Can you share more about Little Craft Loft?

Little Craft Loft is about the love for our children. It is about discovering the meaning in designing and making for our children. The best gifts are made from scratch, showered with love, and crafted with imagination.

I have always loved crafting. I relish the simple joy of creating something beautiful from scratch. I get a lot of satisfaction from dreaming up a design to actually making it with my own hands. I adore my little three year old girl and have channeled this passion into making things for her.

It’s incredibly meaningful and fulfilling to put in time and effort into crafting projects and to see my daughter’s face light up when I finally complete it and give it to her. I’ve made simple toys, birthday decorations and lots of clothes so far.

It doesn’t matter if the end product isn’t perfect or of commercial quality. These don’t matter to children. What matters is that they know that mummy or daddy had specially made it for them. I learnt this when my daughter showed that she could understand, even when she was only 1 year old, that some of her clothes were made by me and would prefer to wear those clothes. It can be difficult sometimes to test fit clothes on her as she would adamantly refuse to take them off!

I started making cake toppers  a year ago as I wanted to create a special gift for my daughter’s second birthday. I came across adorable wedding wooden doll cake toppers in Etsy and wanted to try my hand at making a unique and personalised doll for her birthday.

After learning the basics of making a painted wooden doll, I applied my dress making experience and made whimsical little clothes for the wooden dolls. I hope to create a new doll for her every year based on her current interests.

What can participants expect to make for the course? Is it suitable for children or adult?

I hope to inspire other parents to design and make crafts for their loved ones, starting with wooden doll making. I will teach my own unique way of making a dressed-up doll with hand sewn outfits.

Workshop participants will get to learn this unique crafting hobby and take home their own wooden dolls. They will learn the basics in doll making that involves sketching, painting, selection of fabrics and sewing techniques. It is a hands-on workshop and participants will get all the materials needed to make their own unique dolls.

Parents are more than welcome to participate together with their children. However, as some painting, sewing and glueing work is involved, I would recommend that the children be aged at least 6 and above.

If you are interested in Wei Mun’s work, check out her website at www.littlecraftloft.com.

Programme for the Makers only Nite on 26th July

We will be closing the doors of Singapore Mini Maker Faire to the public at 7pm on Saturday, 26th July 2014. From 7-9, after dinner, there will be a networking session, where Makers will be able to visit each other’s booth. Some presentations will also be made, including the 3D design challenge that was conducted as part of SMMF ’14 as well as exciting happenings and opportunities that makers can look forward to in the later part of this year.

The Singapore Mini Maker Faire 3D Design challenge
26th July 2014, 7.30pm
The inaugural SMMF 3D Design challenge was sponsored by Autodesk Singapore. A wide variety of participants took part in the training sessions.

Upcoming events for Makers
26th July 2014, 7.45pm-8.45pm
Some exciting announcements on Maker events from Science Centre Singapore and Art Science Museum

Presentations on 27th July

Light magic by Kiki Tay, 11.00am

How to make Education by Technology and Art, Masakasu Takasu, 12.00nn

Technology and arts can making a lot of fun. Fun is most important for children growth. It is not only fun, but also Kickstart to growth of children! Let an use technology and art for education. Yes,We Can!

Tatting by Joyce Lim, 1.00pm

Bio printing by Fan MingWei, Bio3D technologies, 2.00pm
Introducing 3D printing and bio-printing, and why they matter.

Leaves with memories, a clay demonstration Davy Young, 2.45pm
A short demo on ceramic leaf making

Design thinking for Makers, Elda Webb, 3.30pm

Using Evernote to Make, Evernote, 4.15pm
Evernote is helping the world remember everything by building innovative products and services that allow individuals to capture, find and interact with their memories. Evernote apps are available on all major computer, web, mobile, and tablet platforms. For more information, please visit: http://www.evernote.com Register to find out more

 

Presentations on 26th July 2014

 The circus Show, by Rhys Thomas, 11.00am

Nico Nico Gakkai Style presentation by Makers, by Masakasu Takasu and various makers – 11.30am
Join Maker Masakasu Takasu and our Makers in Singapore in this presentation, where Makers who create in several different domains come together to share their work in 3 minutes.

Tiny Electronics by Gabriel Perumal, 12.40pm

3D Design, by Badari Hidayur, Autodesk , 1.15pm

Crowdpricing for Makers by HaystackT, 1.50pm

Tesla Coils – How to Make Lightning at Home, by GuangYan, 2.20pm

Gao Guangyan shares his projects and experience as a maker and engineer, known for his crazy home projects and Musical Tesla Coils. Follow his journey and learn how he makes lightning at home with an introduction to Tesla Coils, and view up close the inner workings and see hair-raising live-demos of some new Musical Tesla Coils he has built including a new large one in the Science Centre Singapore

Zen Glove, by Gaurav Gupta, 3.00pm

PCDuino by Jingfeng Liu, 3.35pm

Tatting by Joyce Lim, 4.10pm

Bioprinting by Fan MingWei, Bio 3D Technologies, 4.45pm
Introducing 3D printing and bio-printing, and why they matter.

Making for social change by Veerappan Swaminathan, 5.20pm
How can Making and Social Change go together? In this presentation, we will be sharing come of the cool Social Innovation projects of Sustainable Living Lab, Singapore’s first Makerspace. Veera is the Kampung Tinkerer and co-founder at the Sustainable Living Lab. Trained officially as a mechanical engineer, he spent his formative years being a general nightmare around the house by taking apart (and not always putting together) all kinds of stuff and starting new organizations in LAN gaming, credit card marketing, competition planning, tinkering and sports. He is listed on several biomedical device patents and has built solar cars, wind turbines, EEG headsets and agricultural drying equipment. Being in land-strapped Singapore but wishing to have a garage like all inventors seemed to have in movies, led him to start the Sustainable Living Lab which is Singapore’s first and only Makerspace focused on social innovation, sustainability and technology.

Juggling by Choo Zheng Hao, 6.25pm
Juggling: a physically and intellectually demanding skill which happens to be strangely addictive too. Learn how juggling as a hobby has evolved over the last few decades with the pervasive reach of the Internet. Take a look how social media has radically changed this obscure hobby into a global interactive community.